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Basic Seismic Response Capability of Hospitals in Lima, Peru

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 July 2018

Nicola Liguori
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Lima, Peru
Nicola Tarque*
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Lima, Peru
Celso Bambaren
Affiliation:
School of Public Health and Administration, Cayetano Heredia University, Lima, Peru
Sandra Santa-Cruz
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Lima, Peru
Juan Palomino
Affiliation:
Department of Civil Engineering, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Lima, Peru
Michelangelo Laterza
Affiliation:
Department of Architecture (DiCEM), University of Basilicata, Matera, Italy
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to Nicola Tarque, PhD, Department of Civil Engineering, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel, Lima 32, Perú (e-mail: sntarque@pucp.edu.pe).

Abstract

Objective

The objective of the study was to research the basic seismic response capability (BSRC) of hospitals in Lima Metropolitana. A large number of wounded could be registered in case of an earthquake; therefore, operational hospitals are necessary to cure the injured. The study focused on the operational performance of the hospitals, autonomies of essential resources such as power, water, medical gases, and medicine, in addition to the availability of emergency communication system and ambulances.

Methods

Data by a probabilistic seismic risk analysis have been used to assess the operational level of the hospitals. Subsequently, availability of an essential resource has been combined with the immediately operational hospitals to evaluate the BSRC of the health facilities.

Results

Forty-one of Lima’s hospitals have been analyzed for a seismic event with 72-100 years of a return period. Three hospitals (7.3%) were capable to work in a self-sufficient manner for 72 hours, another three (7.3%) for 24 hours, and one (2.4%) for 12 hours.

Conclusion

Results showed a low performance of the hospitals in case of an earthquake. The issue is due to the high seismic vulnerability of the existing structures. Given the importance of Lima city in Peru, structural and nonstructural retrofitting plans should be implemented to improve the preparedness of the health system in case of an emergency. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:138–143)

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2018 

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