Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-8dvf2 Total loading time: 0.289 Render date: 2022-10-05T03:57:17.159Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

An Exploration of Discrepancies and Concordances Between Hospital Disaster Directors and General Health Care Providers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea: Quantitative Analysis of a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Survey Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 June 2020

Jong-Hak Park
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Hanjin Cho*
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Joo Yeong Kim
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Juhyun Song
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Sungwoo Moon
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Eusang Ahn
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Shira A. Schlesinger
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
Roger J. Lewis
Affiliation:
Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to Hanjin Cho, Department of Emergency Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 123, Jeokgeum-ro, Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, 15355, Korea (e-mail: chohj327@korea.ac.kr or chohj327@gmail.com).

Abstract

Objective:

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the perception of disaster issues between disaster directors and general health care providers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea.

Methods:

The Gyeonggi provincial committee distributed a survey to acute care facility personnel. Survey topics included awareness of general disaster issues, hospital preparedness, and training priorities. The questionnaire comprised multiple choices and items scored on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the discrepancies and characteristics of the responses.

Results:

Completed surveys were returned from 43 (67%) of 64 directors and 145 (55.6%) of 261 health care providers. In the field of general awareness, the topic of how to triage in disaster response showed the greatest discrepancies. In the domain of hospital level disaster preparedness, individual opinions varied most within the topics of incident command, manual preparation. The responses to “accept additional patients in disaster situation” showed the biggest differences (> 21 versus 6~10).

Conclusions:

In this study, there were disaster topics with discrepancies and concordances in perception between disaster directors and general health care providers. The analysis would present baseline information for the development of better training programs for region-specific core competencies, knowledge, and skills required for the effective response.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© 2020 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc.

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Cha, M-I, Choa, M, Kim, S, et al. Changes to the Korean Disaster Medical Assistance System after numerous multi-casualty incidents in 2014 and 2015. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017;11(5):526530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
GyeongGi-Do. Gyeonggi province. n. d. https://english.gg.go.kr/population. Accessed May 1, 2019.Google Scholar
Koenig, KL, Schultz, CH. Koenig and Schultz’s disaster comprehensive principles and practice. 2nd ed. New York: Cambridge University Press; 2016:3851.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
National Disaster Life Support Foundation. n. d. https://www.ndlsf.org/about-ndlsf. Accessed May 1, 2019.Google Scholar
Cheng, A, Morse, KJ, Rudolph, J, et al. Learner-centered debriefing for health care simulation education: lessons for faculty development. Simul Healthc. 2016;11(1):3240.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Siegfried, AL, Carbone, EG, Meit, MB, et al. Identifying and prioritizing information needs and research priorities of public health emergency preparedness and response practitioners. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017;11(5):552561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Park, J-H, Cho, H, Kim, JY, et al. The Sewol ferry disaster: experiences of a community-based hospital in Ansan City. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017;11(3):389393.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rosen, R, Zhu, Z, Shao, Y, et al. Longitudinal change of PTSD symptoms in community members after the World Trade Center destruction. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16(7). doi:10.3390/ijerph16071215.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jacobson, MH, Norman, C, Sadler, P, et al. Characterizing mental health treatment utilization among individuals exposed to the 2001 World Trade Center terrorist attacks 14–15 years post-disaster. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019;16(4). doi:10.3390/ijerph16040626.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
North, CS, Pollio, DE, Smith, RP, et al. Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder among employees of New York City companies affected by the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2011;5(Suppl 2):S205S213. doi:10.1001/dmp.2011.50.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Egawa, S, Suda, T, Jones-Konneh, TEC, et al. Nation-wide implementation of disaster medical coordinators in Japan. Tohoku J Exp Med. 2017;243(1):19.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Matsumoto, H, Motomura, T, Hara, Y, et al. Lessons learned from the aeromedical disaster relief activities following the Great East Japan earthquake. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2013;28(2):166169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walsh, L, Subbarao, I, Gebbie, K, et al. Core competencies for disaster medicine and public health. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2012;6(1):4452.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schultz, CH, Koenig, KL, Whiteside, M, et al. National Standardized All-Hazard Disaster Core Competencies Task Force. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals. Ann Emerg Med. 2012;59(3):196208.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kong, SY, Song, KJ, Shin, SD, et al. Cardiovascular events after the Sewol ferry disaster, South Korea. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2019;34(2):142148.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, J-Y, Kim, S-W, Bae, K-Y, et al. Factors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms among community volunteers during the Sewol ferry disaster in Korea. Compr Psychiatry. 2017;77:3844.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, M-S, Bhang, S-Y, Lee, C-S, et al. Psychiatric symptoms in teachers from Danwon High School after exposure to the sinking of the motor vessel Sewol. Psychiatry Investig. 2017;14(6):900903.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, SM, Han, H, Jang, K-I, et al. Heart rate variability associated with posttraumatic stress disorder in victims’ families of Sewol ferry disaster. Psychiatry Res. 2018;259:277282.10.1016/j.psychres.2017.08.062CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lee, SH, Nam, HS, Kim, HB, et al. Factors associated with complicated grief in students who survived the Sewol ferry disaster in South Korea. Psychiatry Investig. 2018;15(3):254260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Morton, MJ, DeAugustinis, ML, Velasquez, CA, et al. Developments in surge research priorities: a systematic review of the literature following the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, 2007–2015. Acad Emerg Med. 2015;22(11):12351252.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scott, LA, Madden, LA, Wahlquist, AE, et al. Preparing for the surge: a half-day emergency preparedness training course for the “second front”. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2018;12(1):121126.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bayram, JD, Zuabi, S, Subbarao, I. Disaster metrics: quantitative benchmarking of hospital surge capacity in trauma-related multiple casualty events. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2011;5(2):117124.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Toerper, MF, Kelen, GD, Sauer, LM, et al. Hospital surge capacity: a web-based simulation tool for emergency planners. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2017;59:110.Google Scholar
Harris, C, Bell, W, Rollor, E, et al. Medical surge capacity in Atlanta-area hospitals in response to tanker truck chemical releases. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2015;9(6):681689.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Waxman, DA, Chan, EW, Pillemer, F, et al. Assessing and improving hospital mass-casualty preparedness: a no-notice exercise. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(6):662666.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Supplementary material: PDF

Park et al. Supplementary Materials

Park et al. Supplementary Materials 1

Download Park et al. Supplementary Materials(PDF)
PDF 13 KB
Supplementary material: PDF

Park et al. Supplementary Materials

Park et al. Supplementary Materials 2

Download Park et al. Supplementary Materials(PDF)
PDF 92 KB
Supplementary material: PDF

Park et al. Supplementary Materials

Park et al. Supplementary Materials 3

Download Park et al. Supplementary Materials(PDF)
PDF 52 KB

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

An Exploration of Discrepancies and Concordances Between Hospital Disaster Directors and General Health Care Providers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea: Quantitative Analysis of a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Survey Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

An Exploration of Discrepancies and Concordances Between Hospital Disaster Directors and General Health Care Providers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea: Quantitative Analysis of a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Survey Study
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

An Exploration of Discrepancies and Concordances Between Hospital Disaster Directors and General Health Care Providers in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea: Quantitative Analysis of a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Survey Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *