Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-t5pn6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-19T07:13:43.772Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Williams syndrome and deficiency in visuospatial recognition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2001

Miho Nakamura
Affiliation:
Institute for Developmental Research, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Kazuyoshi Watanabe
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatrics, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Japan.
Akiko Matsumoto
Affiliation:
Central Hospital, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Tsutomu Yamanaka
Affiliation:
Central Hospital, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Toshiyuki Kumagai
Affiliation:
Central Hospital, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Shuji Miyazaki
Affiliation:
Residential Facility for Children with Mental and Physical Disabilities, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Masaki Matsushima
Affiliation:
Unit of Paediatric Cardiology, Chyukyo Hospital, Japan.
Katsumi Mita
Affiliation:
Institute for Developmental Research, Aichi Human Service Centre, Aichi, Japan.
Get access

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the visuospatial abilities of five children with Williams syndrome (four males aged 9 years 3 months, 7 years 11 months, 8 years 1 month, and 10 years 8 months respectively, and one female aged 6 years 3 months). First, the children's visuospatial abilities were examined by asking them to copy a figure. Second, their cognitive processing abilities were assessed using the Japanese Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. This test was used because it is an objective one, standardized in Japan, and is a measure of fluid ability including spatial localization. Participants scored significantly low on the spatial memory subtest indicating that there was a deficit in spatial localization. Children's performance in line copying tasks improved when the dots were in colour. Results suggest a deficit in the dorsal stream of visual cognition, with a relatively preserved ventral stream.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2001 Mac Keith Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)