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New ocular movement detector system as a communication tool in ventilator-assisted Werdnig–Hoffmann disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2000

Masaya Kubota
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Yoichi Sakakihara
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Yoshiaki Uchiyama
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Atsushi Nara
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Tsutomu Nagata
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Hiroshi Nitta
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Koh Ishimoto
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Akira Oka
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Keizo Horio
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Masayoshi Yanagisawa
Affiliation:
Quality of Life Conference (QOLC) Group, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
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Abstract

A non-contact communication system was developed for a ventilator-assisted patient with Werdnig–Hoffmann disease who had lost all voluntary movements except for those of the eye. The system detects the extraocular movements and converts them to either a ‘yes’ signal (produced by one lateral eyeball movement) or a ‘no’ signal (produced by two successive lateral eyeball movements) using a video camera placed outside the patient's visual field. The patient is thus able to concentrate on performing a task without any intrusion from the detection system. Once the setting conditions of the device have been selected, there is no need for any resetting, as the patient is unable to move his body. In addition to playing television games, the child can use the device to select television channels, compose music, and learn written Japanese and Chinese characters. This seems to broaden the patient's daily world and promote mental development.

Type
Case Reports
Copyright
© 2000 Mac Keith Press

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New ocular movement detector system as a communication tool in ventilator-assisted Werdnig–Hoffmann disease
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