Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-5dv6l Total loading time: 0.313 Render date: 2021-06-13T18:54:10.920Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Auditory attention processing in 5-year-old children born preterm: evidence from event-related potentials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2000

Remy Dupin
Affiliation:
INSERM 316, Médicine Néonatale, Hôpital de Clocheville, Tours Cedex, France.
Jean-Paul Laurent
Affiliation:
INSERM 316, Médicine Néonatale, Hôpital de Clocheville, Tours Cedex, France.
Johannes E A Stauder
Affiliation:
Falculteit der Psychologie, Universiteit Maastricht, The Netherlands.
Elie Saliba
Affiliation:
INSERM 316, Médicine Néonatale, Hôpital de Clocheville, Tours Cedex, France.
Get access

Abstract

The assumption that children born preterm have difficulties in maintaining active attention was tested in passive and active tasks. Twenty 5-year-old children born preterm at 26 to 32 weeks gestational age were compared with 20 children born at term, matched for age and IQ, using an auditory paradigm. In the passive task participants had to watch a videotape of a cartoon and ignore auditory stimuli. In the active task they had to detect a rare tone (the ‘target’ tone; 10% of the tones presented) among frequent tones (the ‘standard’ tone; 90%). Accuracy and reaction time were analysed, and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded at the scalp sites Fz, Cz, T3, T4, Pz, Oz, and two electrodes for the left mastoid (passive task); and Fz, F7, F8, Cz, T3, T4, Pz, and Oz (for the active task). Behavioural and electrophysiological data were analysed with repeated-measure ANOVAs. The results showed a significant group effect only on the active task. The preterm group scored fewer correct hits (correct detection of target tone) and were less efficient in their attentional strategy as assessed by ERP components.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2000 Mac Keith Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Auditory attention processing in 5-year-old children born preterm: evidence from event-related potentials
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Auditory attention processing in 5-year-old children born preterm: evidence from event-related potentials
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Auditory attention processing in 5-year-old children born preterm: evidence from event-related potentials
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *