Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-5rzhg Total loading time: 0.336 Render date: 2021-11-27T13:03:53.706Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Predicting change in problem behavior from child and family characteristics and stress inreferred children and adolescents

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 1999

JOLANDA J. J. P. MATHIJSSEN
Affiliation:
Erasmus University Rotterdam/Sophia Children's Hospital, The Netherlands
HANS M. KOOT
Affiliation:
Erasmus University Rotterdam/Sophia Children's Hospital, The Netherlands
FRANK C. VERHULST
Affiliation:
Erasmus University Rotterdam/Sophia Children's Hospital, The Netherlands

Abstract

A three-wave longitudinal study design with two 6-month intervals was used to examine the stability and change in Internalizing, Externalizing, and Total Problem behavior among children and adolescents referred to outpatient mental health services. Our results indicated high stabilities for parent ratings of child psychopathology across a 1-year interval. Additionally, we found decreases in the level of problem behavior. Interindividual differences in change were found for Total Problems and Externalizing behavior but not for Internalizing. While both the child's temperament and intelligence level and family relations were related to the initial level of parent-rated problem behavior, only intermediary stressful life events had an influence on the rate of change of child psychopathology.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1999 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
32
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Predicting change in problem behavior from child and family characteristics and stress in referred children and adolescents
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Predicting change in problem behavior from child and family characteristics and stress in referred children and adolescents
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Predicting change in problem behavior from child and family characteristics and stress in referred children and adolescents
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *