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The Pedagogic Significance of Modern Dance Training on the Twenty-First-Century Dancing Body, with Reference to Doris Humphrey's Dance Technique and Movement Philosophy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2013

Abstract

A primary issue for dance education and training is ensuring that the “trained body” is equipped for the range of activity today's dance practitioner will encounter. Modern dance techniques offer a breadth of knowledge on numerous and inter-related levels, encompassing the physical, physiological, artistic, historical, musical, and analytical. This paper will consider the relevance and benefits that “traditional” modern dance training can have on today's dancer. Issues addressed will include what our students are using technique for; what a codified dance technique can offer; and the progression to a “trained body” and how this can be achieved.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2009

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References

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