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Eclipsed on Centre Stage: The (Dis)Abled Body

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2013

Abstract

In working with children with special educational needs both in South Africa and in Denmark, I continue to reflect upon who should dance and how to train dancers who are differently abled. The label of “other” dancer profoundly challenges the notion of “ideal dancing bodies” as “cultures collide.” This paper sets out to engage with the notions of “disability arts” by suggesting some working definitions for this loaded term and provides an examination within the South African context of the multiculturalism of the disabled community, which could be seen as a cultural grouping in and of itself.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2009

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References

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