Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-mn2s7 Total loading time: 0.64 Render date: 2022-01-27T15:44:55.353Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Co-participative Research in a Dance Education Partnership: Nurturing Critical Pedagogy and Social Constructivism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2013

Abstract

Drawing on the Dance Partners for Creativity Research Project, this paper will consider the research methodologies and methods employed by a team of dance education professionals who seek to contribute to reinvigorating practice in relation to young people's creativity in secondary-level dance education in England. They have developed a focus on investigating the kinds of creative partnerships that are manifested between dance-artists and dance-teachers in a range of school settings. Using critical pedagogical and socio-constructivist approaches, the research draws on ethnographic, participatory, and reflective methods. The focus is on how partnerships can function as research sites, with participants as co-researchers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ackroyd, Sue. 2001. “But Is It Creative?” Paper given at a seminar at the Arts Council of England, London. July.Google Scholar
Chappell, Kerry. 2007. “Creativity in Primary Level Dance Education: Moving Beyond Assumption.” Research in Dance Education 8: 2752.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chappell, Kerry. 2008a. “Mediating Creativity and Performativity Policy Tensions in Dance Education-Based Action Research Partnerships: Insights from a Mentor's Self-Study.” Winking Skills and Creativity 3: 94103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chappell, Kerry. 2008b. “Towards Humanising Creativity.” In “Creativity, Policy and Practice Discourses: Productive Tensions in the New Millenium,” special issue, UNESCO Observatory 1 (3). Retrieved January 10, 2010, from <http://www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/unesco/ejournal/vol-one-issue-three.html>..>Google Scholar
Chappell, Kerry, and Craft, Anna. 2009. “What Makes a Creative Learning Conversation?” Paper to be presented at British Educational Research Association Conference, Manchester.Google Scholar
Chappell, Kerry, Anna Craft, and Penelope Best. 2007. “Mapping Ripples of Influence: Understanding Shifts in Practice within the Creativity Action Research Awards 2.” Retrieved January 10, 2010, from <http://education.exeter.ac.uk/projects.php?id=102>..>Google Scholar
Chappell, Kerry, Craft, Anna, Rolfe, Linda, and Jobbins, Veronica. 2009. “Dance Partners for Creativity: Choreographing Space for Co-Participative Research into Creativity and Partnership in Dance Education. Research in Dance Education: Special Issue Creativity 10 (3): 177–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Craft, Anna, 2000. Creativity Across the Primary Curriculum: Framing and Developing Practice. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Craft, Anna, and Jeffrey, Bob. 2008. “Creativity and Performativity in Teaching and Learning: Tensions, Dilemmas, Constraints,Accommodations and Synthesis.” British Educational Research Journal 34: 577–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Creativity, Culture and Education (CCE). 2009. “About Creative Partnerships.” Retrieved January to, 2010, from <http://www.creativitycultureeducation.org/our-programmes/creative-partnerships/>..>Google Scholar
Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF). 2009. Your Child, Your Schools, Our Future: Building a 21st Century School System. London: DCSF.Google Scholar
Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and Department for Culture Mediaand Sport (DCMS). 2008. Government Response to Tony Hall's Dance Review. London: DCSF/DCMS.Google Scholar
Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). 2006. Government Response to Paul Roberts' Review on Nurturing Creativity in Young People. London: DCM.Google Scholar
Galton, Maurice. 2008. Creative Practitioners in Schools and Classrooms. Final Report of the Project: The Pedagogy of Creative Practitioners in Schools. Cambridge: University of Cambridge.Google Scholar
Gore, jennifer. 2003. “What We Can Do for You? What Can ‘We’Do for ‘You’?” In The Critical Pedagogy Reader, edited by Darder, A., Baltodano, M. and Torres, R. D., 331–48. London: Routledge Falmer.Google Scholar
Greene, Maxine. 1995. Releasing the Imagination: Essays on Education the Arts and Social Change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Greene, Maxine. 2003. “In Search of Critical Pedagogy.” In In Critical Pedagogy Reader, edited by Darder, A., Baltodano, M. and Torres, R., 97112. London: Routledge Farmer.Google Scholar
Griffiths, Morwenna. and Woolf, Felicity. 2004. Report on Creative Partnerships Nottingham Action Research. Nottingham: Nottingham Trent University.Google Scholar
Hall, Christine, Thomson, Pat and Russell, Lisa. 2007. “Teaching Like an Artist: The Pedagogic Identities and Practices of Artists in Schools.” British Journal of Sociology of Education 28 (5): 605–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jeffery, Graham. ed. 2005. The Creative College: Building a Successful Learning Culture in the Arts. Stoke on Trent: Trentham Books.Google Scholar
Jobbins, Veronica. 1999. “Curriculum Development: Moving through the Review Process.” Dance Matters 24: 23.Google Scholar
Jobbins, Veronica. 2006. “Dance in School—UK.rdquo; Keynote address at Dance and the Child International Conference The Hague.Google Scholar
John-Steiner, Vera, . 2000. Creative Collaboration. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Lave, Jean, and Wenger, Etienne. 1991. Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lefebvre, Henri. 1991. The Production of Space. Translated by Nicholson-Smith, Donald. Oxford: Black-well.Google Scholar
National Advisory Committee on Creative and Cultural Education (NACCCE). 1999. All Our Futures: Creativity Culture and Education. London: DFEE.Google Scholar
Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED). 2006. Creative Partnerships: Initiative and Ompact. London: OFSTED.Google Scholar
Pringle, Emily, 2008. “Artists' Perspectives on Art Practice and Pedagogy.” In Creative Learning, edited by Sefton-Green, J.. London: Creative Partnerships.Google Scholar
Roberts, Paul. 2006. Nurturing Creativity in Young People. London: DCMS.Google Scholar
Rose, Jim. 2009. Independent Review of the Primary Curriculum. Nottingham: DCSF.Google Scholar
Smith-Autard, Jacqueline. 2002. The Art of Dance in Education. 2nd ed.London: A and C Black.Google Scholar
Soja, Edward. W. 1999. “Thirdspace: Expanding the Scope of the Geographical Imagination.” In Human Geography Today, edited by Massey, D., Allen, J. and Sarre, P., 260–78. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Tishman, Shari, and Palmer, Patricia. 2006. Artful Thinking: Stronger Thinking and Learning through the Power of Art. Project Zero. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Graduate School of Education.Google Scholar
Wenger, Etienne. 1998. Communities of Practice, Learning, Meaning and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zeichner, Ken. 2008. “Creating Third Spaces in the Education of Teachers and Education Researchers.” Keynote presentation at the British Educational Research Association Conference, Edinburgh.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Co-participative Research in a Dance Education Partnership: Nurturing Critical Pedagogy and Social Constructivism
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Co-participative Research in a Dance Education Partnership: Nurturing Critical Pedagogy and Social Constructivism
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Co-participative Research in a Dance Education Partnership: Nurturing Critical Pedagogy and Social Constructivism
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *