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Homeland Insecurity: How Immigrant Muslims Naturalize America in Islam

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2011

Mucahit Bilici*
Affiliation:
John Jay College, City University of New York

Extract

There are approximately six million Muslims in the United States. They come from a great variety of backgrounds. Among the few things they have in common are Islam as a religion and their American experience. The latter produces some previously unencountered consequences, including the rise of English as the language of Muslim ummah (community) and the reality of being a “minority” in a non-Muslim society. The American experience also raises questions of citizenship, identity, and integration.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Society for the Comparative Study of Society and History 2011

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