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A Phase-Field Model Coupled with Lattice Kinetics Solver for Modeling Crystal Growth in Furnaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2015

Guang Lin*
Affiliation:
Computational Mathematics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA
Jie Bao*
Affiliation:
Fluid and Computational Engineering Group, Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA
Zhijie Xu*
Affiliation:
Computational Mathematics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA
Alexandre M. Tartakovsky*
Affiliation:
Computational Mathematics Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA
Charles H. Henager Jr.*
Affiliation:
Engineering Mechanics and Structure Materials Group, Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 USA
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Abstract

In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global Science Press Limited 2014

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