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An Improved Second-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Detached-Eddy Simulation Based on Hybrid Grids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 July 2016

Yang Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Aerodynamics, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China Low Speed Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China
Laiping Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Aerodynamics, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China Computational Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China
Xin He
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Aerodynamics, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China Computational Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang Sichuan 621000, China
Xiaogang Deng
Affiliation:
National University of Defense Technology, Changsha Hunan 410073, China
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Abstract

A hybrid grid based second-order finite volume algorithm has been developed for Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) of turbulent flows. To alleviate the effect caused by the numerical dissipation of the commonly used second order upwind schemes in implementing DES with unstructured computational fluid dynamics (CFD) algorithms, an improved second-order hybrid scheme is established through modifying the dissipation term of the standard Roe's flux-difference splitting scheme and the numerical dissipation of the scheme can be self-adapted according to the DES flow field information. By Fourier analysis, the dissipative and dispersive features of the new scheme are discussed. To validate the numerical method, DES formulations based on the two most popular background turbulence models, namely, the one equation Spalart-Allmaras (SA) turbulence model and the two equation kω Shear Stress Transport model (SST), have been calibrated and tested with three typical numerical examples (decay of isotropic turbulence, NACA0021 airfoil at 60° incidence and 65° swept delta wing). Computational results indicate that the issue of numerical dissipation in implementing DES can be alleviated with the hybrid scheme, the resolution for turbulence structures is significantly improved and the corresponding solutions match the experimental data better. The results demonstrate the potentiality of the present DES solver for complex geometries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global-Science Press 2016 

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An Improved Second-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Detached-Eddy Simulation Based on Hybrid Grids
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