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Enumeration Schemes for Restricted Permutations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2008

VINCENT VATTER*
Affiliation:
School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St AndrewsSt Andrews, Fife KY19 9SS, UK (e-mail: vince@mcs.st-and.ac.ukhttp://turnbull.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/~vince)

Abstract

Zeilberger's enumeration schemes can be used to completely automate the enumeration of many permutation classes. We extend his enumeration schemes so that they apply to many more permutation classes and describe the Maple package WilfPlus, which implements this process. We also compare enumeration schemes to three other systematic enumeration techniques: generating trees, substitution decompositions, and the insertion encoding.

Type
Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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References

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Enumeration Schemes for Restricted Permutations
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