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Problem and Pathological Gambling: A Consumer Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

The growth of gambling across the United States over the past decade has created significant difficulties for pathological gamblers. The rise in problem gambling, coupled with an increasing strain on social and health care services for treatment of gamblers and their families, has resulted in an urgent need for innovative interventions that target patients, health care providers, educational institutions, government, media, and the gambling industry. This article describes the impact of gambling from a consumer-protection perspective, and offers approaches to promoting public awareness of compulsive gambling as a pervasive problem that affects multiple areas of society.

Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

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References

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