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Insight in Body Dysmorphic Disorder with and Without Comorbid Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the level of insight in patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) with and without comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and to measure its possible relationships with clinical features.

Methods: Thirty outpatients affected by BDD, according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, Fourth Edition criteria, of whom 18 were also suffering from OCD, were included in the study. Clinical assessment was carried out by means of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale modified for BDD and a specially designed OCD Questionnaire. The level of insight was measured by means of the score at item 11 of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale modified for BDD.

Results: The insight resulted to be excellent in four cases, good in four, fair in five, poor in 15 and absent in two. Significant and positive correlations were observed between the level of insight and the following items: resistance to thoughts and to activities as well as to time spent on activities and control on activities related to the defect. The insight was significantly lower in patients affected by both BDD and OCD.

Conclusion: The findings indicate that the majority of BDD patients in this study, and especially those with comorbid OCD, have a low degree of insight that is significantly correlated to symptoms specific of the disorder.

Type
Orginal Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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