Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-pc5cw Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-09-27T17:58:00.524Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Findings with 0.25 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test in Eating Disorders: Association with Childhood Trauma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

Introduction: While both blunted and enhanced cortisol suppression following a dexamethasone suppression test (DST) are described in eating disorders, some evidence suggests that enhanced cortisol suppression might be associated with the presence of trauma history. The objective of this study is to investigate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to a modified DST in eating disorders and its relationship with childhood trauma.

Methods: Fifty-two patients with eating disorders were studied with a 0.25 mg DST and with measures of childhood trauma.

Conclusion: Patients with bulimia symptoms had significantly greater cortisol suppression than controls and restrictive anorexia patients (F=8.2, P<.05). Cortisol suppression was significantly correlated with intensity of childhood traumatic events (F=0.32, P<.05). Hypersensitive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to DST in eating disorders may be related with a history of childhood trauma and suggests some biological similarities with posttraumatic syndromes that should be further explored.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Fink, M. Should the dexamethasone test be resurrected? Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005;112:245291.Google ScholarPubMed
2.Brambilla, F, Ferrari, E, Brunetta, M, et al.Psychoimmunoendocrine investigation in anorexia nervosa. Neuropsychobiology. 1993;27:916.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Estour, B, Pugeat, M, Lang, F, et al.Rapid escape of cortisol from suppression in response to i.v. dexamethasone in anorexia nervosa. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1990;33:4552.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Schweitzer, I, Tuckwell, V, Maguire, K, Tiller, J. Personality pathology, depression and HPA axis functioning. Hum Psychopharmacol. 2001;16:303308.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Fichter, MM, Pirke, KM, Pöllinger, J, Wolfram, G, Brunner, E. Disturbances in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal and other neuroendocrine axes in bulimia. Biol Psychiatry. 1990;27:10211037.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.Neudeck, P, Jacoby, GE, Florin, I. Dexamethasone suppression test using saliva cortisol measurement in bulimia nervosa. Physiol Behav. 2001;72:9398.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Steiger, H, Gauvin, L, Israël, M. Association of serotonin and cortisol indices with childhood abuse in bulimia nervosa. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001;58:837843.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Díaz-Marsá, M, Carrasco, JL, Sáiz, J. A study of temperament and personality in anorexia and bulimia nervosa. J Personal Disord. 2000;14:352359.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9.Kellner, M, Yehuda, R, Arlt, J, Wiedemann, K. Longitudinal course of salivary cortisol in post-traumatic stress disorder. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2002;105:153155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Rinne, T, de Kloet, ER, Wouters, L, Goekoop, JG, DeRijk, RH, van den Brink, W. Hyperresponsiveness of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to combined dexamethasone / corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge in female borderline personality disorder subjects with a history of sustained childhood abuse. Biol Psychiatry. 2002;52:11021112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Yehuda, R, Halligan, SL, Golier, JA, Grossman, R, Bierer, LM. Effects of trauma exposure on the cortisol response to dexamethasone administration in PTSD and major depressive disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2004;29:389404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12.Barton, C, March, S, Witertt, GA. The low dose dexamethasone suppression test: effect of time of administration and dose. J Endocrinol Invest. 2002;25:RC10RC12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Carrasco, JL, Díaz-Marsá, M, Pastrana, J, Molina, R, Brotons, LHorcajadas, L. Enhanced suppression of cortisol after dexamethasone test in borderline personality disorder. A pilot study [Spanish]. Actas Esp Psiquiatr. 2003;31:138141.Google Scholar
14.Henderson, M, Freeman, CP. A self-rating scale for bulimia. The ‘BITE’. Br J Psychiatry. 1987;150:1825.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Bernstein, DP, Stein, JA, Newcomb, MD, et al.Development and validation of a brief screening version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Child Abuse Negl. 2003;27:169190.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16.Grossman, R, Yehuda, R, New, A. Dexamethasone suppression test findings in subjects with personality disorders: associations with posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. Am J Psychiatry. 2003;160:12911297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
17.Lange, W, Wulff, H, Berea, C, et al.Dexamethasone suppression test in borderline personality disorder. Effects of posttraumatic stress disorder. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005;30:919923.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18.Westrin, A, Frii, K, Träskman-Bendz, L. The dexamethasone suppression test and DSM-III-R diagnoses in suicide attempters. Eur Psychiatry. 2003;18:350355.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
19.Silk, KR, Lee, S, Hill, EM, Lohr, NE. Borderline personality disorder symptoms and severity of sexual abuse. Am J Psychiatry. 1995;152:10591064.Google ScholarPubMed
20.Lacey, JH. Incest, incestuous fantasy & indecency. A clinical catchment area study of normal-weight bulimic women. Br J Psychiatry. 1990;157:399403.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
21.Grilo, CM, Levy, KN, Becker, DF, Edell, WS, McGlashan, TH. Comorbidity of DSM-III-R axis I and II disorders among female inpatients with eating disorders. Psychiatr Serv. 1996;47:426429.Google ScholarPubMed
22.Basurte, E, Diaz-Marsa, M, Martin, O, Carrasco, JL. Traumatic antecedents, impulsivity and HPA axis dysfunctions in eating disorders. A pilot study [Spanish]. Actas Esp Psiquiatr. 2004;32:149152.Google Scholar
25
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Findings with 0.25 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test in Eating Disorders: Association with Childhood Trauma
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Findings with 0.25 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test in Eating Disorders: Association with Childhood Trauma
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Findings with 0.25 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test in Eating Disorders: Association with Childhood Trauma
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *