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An Atypical Presentation of Anton Syndrome in a Patient with Preserved Cognition Despite Multiple Cerebral Infarcts: A Case Report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Extract

Visual anosognosia (Anton syndrome) is a rare complication of cortical blindness that results from injury to the visual association cortex, in which patients who are unable to see deny that they are blind. They sometimes confabulate explanations for their visual problems (“there is not enough light to see”), or endanger themselves in efforts to “prove” that they can see (eg, tripping or walking into walls). Without functioning visual-association centers, these patients lack the concept of sight and are unable to acknowledge their impairment. Usually, Anton syndrome is encountered in patients with bilateral occipital infarcts but no other cause for impaired vision. We present an atypical case of Anton syndrome in which the patient's underlying visual deficit was due to advanced glaucoma.

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Grand Rounds
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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References

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An Atypical Presentation of Anton Syndrome in a Patient with Preserved Cognition Despite Multiple Cerebral Infarcts: A Case Report
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