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Potassium Release from Micas and Characterization of the Alteration Products

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2018

P. Dreher
Affiliation:
Lehrstuhl für Bodenkunde der Technischen Universität München, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
E.-A. Niederbudde
Affiliation:
Lehrstuhl für Bodenkunde der Technischen Universität München, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany

Abstract

Interlayer K from two biotites of different origin was extracted with octadecylammonium chloride (ODA) and sodium chloride/sodium tetraphenylboron (STB) before and after oxidation with saturated bromine water (Br2). Potassium release, Fe oxidation and Fe ejection from octahedra were measured. With ODA and STB the untreated biotites released between 40 and 90% of initial interlayer K, the muscovite less than 5%. After Br2 treatment, substantially less K was extracted from both biotites. Suppression of K release was caused by the formation of octahedral vacancies formerly occupied by Fe. The extent of Fe ejection was not proportional to the extent of octahedral Fe oxidation. During Br2 treatment, the biotites transformed into hydrobiotite. The hydrobiotite sample, high in Fe ejection during preceding Br2 treatment, strongly resisted subsequent K extraction with STB, whereas the sample with minor Fe ejection transformed to vermiculite. Octadecylammonium chloride extracts K more effectively than STB from biotites intermediate between trioctahedral and dioctahedral structure and is considered to be suitable for the distinction between biotite K and muscovite K.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1994

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