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Mineralogical and physicochemical characterization of a natural bleaching earth containing sepiolite suitable for fast filtration and bioseparation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2018

K. Emmerich*
Affiliation:
Competence Center for Material Moisture, Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany Institute for Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
A. Steudel
Affiliation:
Competence Center for Material Moisture, Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany Institute for Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
R. Schuhmann
Affiliation:
Competence Center for Material Moisture, Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany Institute for Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
P. G. Weidler
Affiliation:
Institute for Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, Campus North, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
F. Ruf
Affiliation:
SÜD-CHEMIE AG, Ostenrieder Str. 15, 85368 Moosburg, Germany
U. Sohling
Affiliation:
SÜD-CHEMIE AG, Ostenrieder Str. 15, 85368 Moosburg, Germany

Abstract

A clay from the Mediterranean area classified as natural bleaching earth was comprehensively characterized and the quantitative phase content was determined. Morphology and surface characteristics were determined by environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and nitrogen adsorption. The BET surface area was >200 m2 g–1 and the average mesopore diameter was >10 nm. Thus the clay is suitable for bioseparation of larger proteins. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), cation exchange capacity (CEC), layer charge measurement and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) were used for mineralogical characterization. Determination of the phase content by Rietveld analysis was possible only after Sr2+ saturation, while Rietveld analysis of XRD patterns from Na+-saturated clay resulted in a strong overestimation of the amorphous content and masking of the sepiolite. The clay consists of sepiolite, dioctahedral smectite with high layer charge and low stack height, X-ray amorphous matter (probably mainly SiO2) and accessory feldspars.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2010

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