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An Unusually Interlayered Clay Mineral from the Eluvial Horizon of a Humus-Iron Podzol

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2018

A. R. Fraser
Affiliation:
Division of Soils and Soil Microbiology, The Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB9 2QJ, UK

Abstract

The <2 µm fraction from the eluvial horizon of a humus-iron podzol is composed predominantly of a dioctahedral mineral with a basal spacing of 14.7 Å which contracts to 13.7 Å on solvation with glycol, and to 11.4 Å on heating to 300°C. The interlayer region is partially filled with an amorphous organo-Fe-Al complex which is very unstable and is affected by every treatment employed, even homoionic cation saturation. The mineral has a mica-like morphology, contains 3.4% non-exchangeable K2O and is considered to be an interstratified mica-vermiculite formed by the weathering of mica. The contraction of the basal spacing with glycol is probably due to water being removed from the interlayer region of the vermiculite component, leaving only the natural organo-complex in the interlayer; alternatively, the contraction may be more apparent than real, resulting from an interstratification effect. Treatment with H2O2 results in partial expansion with glycol.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1994

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An Unusually Interlayered Clay Mineral from the Eluvial Horizon of a Humus-Iron Podzol
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