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Menander's Hypobolimaios

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2009

Extract

DR. G. Zuntz's excellent paper on these verses in Proc. Brit. Acad. xlii (1956), 209–46, deserves all our thanks for the clarity and good sense of its exposition, and for clearing away much unnecessary comment that has been encumbering the fragment, especially Bignone's theory (Atene e Roma, i [1933], 30, and L'Aristotele perduto, i [1936], 94) that it derives its philosophy directly from Aristotle's Protreptikos, with Körte's supplement that (since all of it derives from this same source) it is indivisible—that there is no break at v. 7; see Körte's Menandri quae supersunt (1953), ii. 147–8. There is, however, I think, room for further comment on Zuntz's interpretation of the lines, and on his view that die fragment known as Papyrus Didotiana b (Körte, i. 145) may belong to the same play, Hypobolimaios.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Classical Association 1960

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References

page 103 note 1 [The edition of Körte-Thierfelder (1959), ibid., omits all reference to Bignone and prints two separate fragments.]

page 104 note 1 I note that Zuntz accepts Kock's fr. 483 as belonging to fr. 417 (Körte) in spite of a gap between the two in Stobaios, and complains (rightly) that it is omitted altogether in Körte.

page 105 note 1 Zuntz, p. 223, says that the insistence on grief in this world is characteristic of the age of Menander; ‘when the Greeks had passed their heroic and tragic ages, this is what remained’. But the optimistic fifth century, and Homer, had felt much the same.

page 105 note 2 I think may here mean rain rather than water. As Zuntz points out (p. 224), the speaker is not cataloguing the elements. (It is perhaps necessary to remind ourselves that rain is generally a blessing in Attica—Clouds 299, 1115.)

I prefer to adopt rather than , adopted by Körte, at the end of v. 5, but with the comma before it.

page 106 note 1 Including Sappho, e.g. 105 , as I should have said in my article in J.H.S. lxxvii (1937) rather than ‘a simile carried beyond the immediate purpose of comparison, for its own sake’.Google Scholar

page 108 note 1 is Herzog's emendation, anc Bucheler's supplement. Both seem right but the result is not entirely happy: three words on the one side, for the good, only one on the other; and the article with is not altogether easy.

page 108 note 2 I think the subscription is as likely as anything to be the schoolboy's comment on his master. ‘Ariston's a philosopher: his lesson’.

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