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Polymorphism of MC4R Asp298Asn site and its relationship with backfat thickness in commercial pigs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2009

Yang Xiao-Hui
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China
Liu Yuan
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China
Tang Hui
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China
Zhang Ning-Bo
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China
Wu Ying
Affiliation:
Institute of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jinan 250100, China
Wei Shu-Dong
Affiliation:
Bureau of Livestock of Laiwu City, Shandong Province, Laiwu 271100, China
Jiang Yun-Liang
Affiliation:
College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271018, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a member of the superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which affects body weight, energy homeostasis and food intake in humans and mice. In this study, the Asp298Asn polymorphism of the MC4R gene was investigated in Laiwu, Yorkshire×Laiwu and commercial cross-bred pig populations using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and the relationship of this mutation with backfat thickness was analysed. The results indicated that only genotype 11 exists in 33 individuals of Laiwu pigs, and three genotypes (11, 12 and 22) were detected in Yorkshire×Laiwu and commercial cross-bred populations. The distributions of allele and genotype frequencies in Yorkshire×Laiwu and commercial cross-bred populations were similar, with the frequency of allele 1 being higher than that of allele 2. In commercial cross-bred pigs, the mean backfat thickness of individuals with genotype 22 was significantly higher than that of individuals with genotypes 12 (P<0.01) and 11 (P<0.05). This study provides evidence that the Asp298Asn polymorphism of the MC4R gene is associated with backfat thickness in commercial cross-bred pigs with Western pigs as parental lines and, therefore, can be used as a DNA marker for breeding in such populations of pigs.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University 2008

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Footnotes

First published in Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology 2008, 16(3): 407–411

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