Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-hb754 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-02-25T21:46:34.339Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Inheritance and resistance to insects in CryIA(c) transgenic cabbage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2007

Li Han-Xia*
Affiliation:
College of Horticulture and Forestry, Huazhong Agricultural University; National Vegetable Improvement Center, Wuhan 430070, China
Yin Ruo-He
Affiliation:
College of Horticulture and Forestry, Huazhong Agricultural University; National Vegetable Improvement Center, Wuhan 430070, China
Lu Ya-Chun
Affiliation:
College of Horticulture and Forestry, Huazhong Agricultural University; National Vegetable Improvement Center, Wuhan 430070, China
Zhang Yu-Yang
Affiliation:
College of Horticulture and Forestry, Huazhong Agricultural University; National Vegetable Improvement Center, Wuhan 430070, China
Zhang Jun-Hong
Affiliation:
College of Horticulture and Forestry, Huazhong Agricultural University; National Vegetable Improvement Center, Wuhan 430070, China
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: hxli@mail.hzau.edu.cn

Abstract

Using hypocotyl segments of aseptic seedlings of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) as explants, regenerated plants with kanamycin resistance were obtained mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens (strain LBA4404). The transformed plants with the CryIA(c) (Bt) gene were confirmed by Southern blotting analysis, indicating the integration of the transgene into the cabbage genome. The majority of the transgenic plants had only a single copy of the inserted CryIA(c) gene. Leaf section bioassays showed that resistance against larvae of diamondback moth in CryIA(c) transgenic cabbage was significantly enhanced. The inheritance patterns of the transgene in T1 offspring of transgenic cabbage were investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and a kanamycin resistance test on the leaves of young seedlings. The results showed that dominant gene loci, CryIA(c) or neomycin phosphotransferase gene (NPTII), followed Mendelian inheritance, with a ratio of 3:1 segregation in T1 populations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University and Cambridge University Press 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

First published in Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology 2006, 14(4): 546–550

References

Cao, J, Tang, JD, Strizhov, N, Shelton, AM and Earle, ED (1999) Transgenic broccoli with high levels of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1C protein control diamondback moth larvae resistant to Cry1A or Cry1C. Molecular Breeding 5: 131141.Google Scholar
Cao, J, Shelton, AM and Earle, ED (2001) Gene expression and insect resistance in transgenic broccoli containing a Bacillus thuringiensis cry1Ab gene with the chemically inducible PR-1a promoter. Molecular Breeding 8: 207216.Google Scholar
Cao, J, Zhao, JZ, Tang, DJ, Shelton, AM and Earle, ED (2002) Broccoli plants with pyramided cry1Ac and cry1C Bt genes control diamondback moths resistant to Cry1A and Cry1C proteins. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 105: 258264.Google Scholar
Fulton, TM, Chunwongse, H and Tanksley, SD (1995) Microprep protocol for extraction of DNA from tomato and other herbaceous plants. Plant Molecular Biology Reporter 13: 207209.Google Scholar
Khus, GS and Bar, DS (1991) Genetics of resistance to insects in crop plants. Advances in Agronomy 45: 223227.Google Scholar
Li, XB, Mao, HZ and Bai, YY (1995) Transgenic plants of rutabaga tolerant to pest insects. Plant Cell Reports 15: 97101.Google Scholar
Mao, H, Tang, T, Cao, X, Bai, Y, Guo, P and Fu, W (1996) Inheritance and resistance to insects in transgenic cabbage. Chinese Science Bulletin C 26: 339347.Google Scholar
Matzke, AJM, Neuhiber, F, Park, YD, Ambros, PF and Matzke, MA (1994) Homology dependent gene silencing in transgenic plants: epistatic silencing loci contain multiple copies of methylated transgenes. Molecular and General Genetics 244: 219229.Google Scholar
Metz, TD, Dixit, R and Earle, ED (1995) Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata). Plant Cell Reports 15: 287292.Google Scholar
Sambrook, J, Fritsch, EF and Maniatis, T (1989) Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed. Cold Spring Harbor, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.Google Scholar
Sparrow, PA, Townsend, TM, Arthur, AE, Dale, PJ and Irwin, JA (2004) Genetic analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens susceptibility in Brassica oleracea. Theoretical and Applied Genetics 108: 644650.Google Scholar
Xie, X (1999) Advances and prospects of research on insect-resistant transgenic plants. Progress in Biotechnology 19: 4752.Google Scholar