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AFLP analyses on genetic diversity and structure of Eupatorium adenophorum populations in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2008

Huang Wen-Kun
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100094, China College of Bio-Safety Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128, China
Guo Jian-Ying
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
Wan Fang-Hao*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
Gao Bi-Da*
Affiliation:
College of Bio-Safety Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128, China
Xie Bing-Yan
Affiliation:
Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail: wanfangh@public3.bta.net.cn or bdgao@public.cs.hn.cn
*Corresponding author. E-mail: wanfangh@public3.bta.net.cn or bdgao@public.cs.hn.cn

Abstract

Eupatorium adenophorum (crofton weed) is one of the most widespread invasive species in China. Its genetic diversity and population structure in China were analysed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Three primer pairs were selected for the analysis and 490 bands were produced from 62 E. adenophorum populations selected from five major geographic areas. A total of 328 of the bands showed polymorphism [percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB)=59.4%]. Diversity levels of populations were relatively high (mean expected heterozygosity=0.154, mean Shannon index=0.241). At the regional level, the AMOVA indicated that about 70.25% of variation in the data set was from genotypic variations within populations, whereas 8.04% of the variation was due to regional differences, and the remaining 21.71% to differences among populations within the provincial regions. Cluster analysis based on the unweighted pair-group method using the method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) grouped the majority of E. adenophorum populations into four main clusters, which correspond to their geographic regions. It is concluded that E. adenophorum spread mainly by wind or water and its genetic diversity level in newly invaded areas was lower than that in formerly colonized areas.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © China Agricultural University 2008

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Footnotes

First published in Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology 2007, 15(6): 992–1000

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