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School-Based Programme for Young Children with Disruptive Behaviours: Two-Year Follow-Up

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 January 2018

Debbie Plath*
Affiliation:
Debbie Plath Consulting, 20 The Terrace, The Hill, NSW, 2300, Australia
*
address for correspondence: Debbie Plath, Debbie Plath Consulting, 20 The Terrace, The Hill, NSW, 2300, Australia. E-mail: debbieplath@optusnet.com.au

Abstract

Got It! is an early intervention programme for children with emerging conduct problems offered to families in schools. This article builds on prior research and reports on outcomes and experiences for a cohort of participants two years after programme completion. Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) child conduct scores were obtained pre-intervention, and at three post-intervention time-points, and were used to map children's behaviour trajectories. Whilst statistically significant two-year post-intervention improvement was not found for the whole sample, qualitative parent interviews produced insights into experiences of children in different behaviour trajectory groups, including sustained improvement, no improvement and fluctuating child behaviour. The findings provide a better understanding of the role that Got It! can play in assisting families with young children with conduct concerns. The targeted group intervention appears to have a lasting impact for children who maintain a shift from the abnormal to normal behaviour bands. For the group of children who began and remained in the abnormal or borderline bands, however, Got It! also had a role to play in linking families with specialist follow-up services. The integration of Got It! within schools and the value of professional development and consultation for teachers is also indicated.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2018 

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