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Parenting Today: A State-Wide Representative Survey of Contemporary Parenting Experiences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 February 2018

Catherine Wade*
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Jan Matthews
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Catherine A. Bent
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Erica Neill
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Zvezdana Petrovic
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Jane Fisher
Affiliation:
Jean Hailes Research Unit, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Annette Michaux
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Warren Cann
Affiliation:
Parenting Research Centre, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia
*
address for correspondence: Catherine Wade, Parenting Research Centre, 5/232 Victoria Parade, East Melbourne, VIC 3002, Australia. E-mail: cwade@parentingrc.org.au

Abstract

This article describes the study design of Parenting Today in Victoria: a representative survey of contemporary parenting experiences, behaviours, concerns and needs of parents. The aims of the study, sample design, survey content development processes, including pilot survey administration, data collection procedures and demographic characteristics of the sample are described. The survey was administered via computer assisted telephone interviewing using random dialling of landline and mobile phone numbers in 2016 to parents of children aged 0–18 years who were living in Victoria, Australia. The response rate was 57% with 2600 parents surveyed (40% fathers). The sample was broadly representative of the Victorian population on major demographic characteristics when compared to data from the Australian Census of Population and Housing (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011). However, adjustments were made for over representation of younger parents (16–34 years), more highly educated parents and for those living outside major cities. This survey provides rigorously collected, accurate and up-to-date information about the experiences, preferences and concerns of a large and representative sample of parents. Findings will provide vital new insights to inform policy decision making, service planning and future research aimed at understanding parents’ attitudes and behaviours, and the psychology behind their help-seeking.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2018 

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