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Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome: a single exercise stress test might be misleading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 November 2016

Arash Salavitabar
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States of America
Eric S. Silver
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States of America
Leonardo Liberman*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: L. Liberman, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, 3959 Broadway, Room 255, New York, NY 10032, United States of America. Tel: 212 305 8509; Fax: 212 342 5721; E-mail: ll202@cumc.columbia.edu

Abstract

Risk stratification of patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome for sudden death is a complex process, particularly in understanding the utility of the repeat exercise stress test. We report a case of an 18-year-old patient who was found to have a high-risk pathway by both invasive and exercise stress testing after an initial exercise stress test showing beat-to-beat loss of pre-excitation.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

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