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Radiation exposure in transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus closure: time to tune?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 January 2018

Olivier Villemain
Affiliation:
M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
Sophie Malekzadeh-Milani
Affiliation:
M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
Fidelio Sitefane
Affiliation:
M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
Meriem Mostefa-Kara
Affiliation:
M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
Younes Boudjemline*
Affiliation:
M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
*
Author for correspondence: Y. Boudjemline, MD, PhD, M3C-Necker Enfants malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Tel: (33) 1 44 49 43 44; Fax: (33) 1 44 49 43 40; E-mail: yboudjemline@yahoo.fr

Abstract

Objectives

The aims of this study were to describe radiation level at our institution during transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus occlusion and to evaluate the components contributing to radiation exposure.

Background

Transcatheter occlusion relying on X-ray imaging has become the treatment of choice for patients with patent ductus arteriosus. Interventionists now work hard to minimise radiation exposure in order to reduce risk of induced cancers.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive children who underwent transcatheter closure of patent ductus arteriosus from January 2012 to January 2016. Clinical data, anatomical characteristics, and catheterisation procedure parameters were reported. Radiation doses were analysed for the following variables: total air kerma, mGy; dose area product, Gy.cm2; dose area product per body weight, Gy.cm2/kg; and total fluoroscopic time.

Results

A total of 324 patients were included (median age=1.51 [Q1–Q3: 0.62–4.23] years; weight=10.3 [6.7–17.0] kg). In all, 322/324 (99.4%) procedures were successful. The median radiation doses were as follows: total air kerma: 26 (14.5–49.3) mGy; dose area product: 1.01 (0.56–2.24) Gy.cm2; dose area product/kg: 0.106 (0.061–0.185) Gy.cm2/kg; and fluoroscopic time: 2.8 (2–4) min. In multivariate analysis, a weight >10 kg, a ductus arteriosus width <2 mm, complications during the procedure, and a high frame rate (15 frames/second) were risk factors for an increased exposure.

Conclusion

Lower doses of radiation can be achieved with subsequent recommendations: technical improvement, frame rate reduction, avoidance of biplane cineangiograms, use of stored fluoroscopy as much as possible, and limitation of fluoroscopic time. A greater use of echocardiography might even lessen the exposure.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2018 

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