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Preoperative bioelectrical impedance predicts intensive care length of stay in children following cardiac surgery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2018

Luise V. Marino*
Affiliation:
Department of Dietetics/SLT, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
Michael J. Griksaitis
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
John V. Pappachan
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
*
Author for correspondence: L. V. Marino, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, S016 6YD, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 23 8079 6000; Fax: +44 (0) 23 8120 3088; E-mail: luise.marino@uhs.nhs.uk

Abstract

We have previously shown that children with a bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy phase angle at 50° (PA 50°) of <2.7 on postoperative day 2 had a four-fold increase in the risk of prolonged paediatric intensive care length of stay. In this study, we demonstrate a relationship between a baseline measure of phase angle 200/5° and postoperative length of stay.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2018 

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References

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Preoperative bioelectrical impedance predicts intensive care length of stay in children following cardiac surgery
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