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Portal vein thrombosis in Fontan-associated liver disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2020

Renate Kaulitz*
Affiliation:
Division Pediatric Cardiology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Tuebingen University Children’s Hospital, Germany
Ludger Sieverding
Affiliation:
Division Pediatric Cardiology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Tuebingen University Children’s Hospital, Germany
Michael Hofbeck
Affiliation:
Division Pediatric Cardiology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Tuebingen University Children’s Hospital, Germany
*
Author for correspondence: R. Kaulitz, MD, Division Pediatric Cardiology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Tuebingen University Children’s Hospital, Hoppe-Seyler Str. 1, D-72076Tuebingen, Germany. Tel: +49 7071 2984711; Fax: +49 7071 295693. E-mail: renate.kaulitz@med.uni-tuebingen.de

Abstract

A 25-year-old patient with signs of cirrhosis on ultrasound and CT presented with portal vein thrombosis on routine follow-up examinations; retrograde hepatic wedge angiography demonstrated only the right-sided portal vein branch. Development of a portosystemic collateral vessel to the left-sided renal vein prevented signs of hypersplenism. This unique complication of portal vein thrombosis should be considered during long-term surveillance.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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