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Percutaneous catheter interventions via Glidesheath Slender in small children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 August 2020

Katarzyna Gendera
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Centre Munich, Technische Universität München, München, Germany
Andreas Eicken
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Centre Munich, Technische Universität München, München, Germany
Peter Ewert
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Centre Munich, Technische Universität München, München, Germany
Stanimir Georgiev
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Centre Munich, Technische Universität München, München, Germany
Daniel Tanase
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease, German Heart Centre Munich, Technische Universität München, München, Germany
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Catheterization in small children should be performed with the lowest diameter introducer sheaths to prevent permanent vessel damage. The objective of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of the Glidesheath Slender in small children.

Methods and results:

We present a group of 52 patients (male: n = 36) with median age 118.5 days (min. 3; max. 1302), median weight: 5.3 kg (min. 1.4; max. 14.0), median height: 60.5 cm (min. 39; max. 102), and median body surface area 0.28 m2 (min. 0.12; max. 0.63) in whom percutaneous catheter interventions (n = 55) were performed via a Glidesheath Slender. In 49 children, the intervention was performed from femoral access (artery n = 35; vein n = 14) in 2 from the axillary arterial access and in 1 from the jugular venous access. In all patients, the vessel access was obtained under ultrasound guidance. After the catheterization, the pulse on the peripheral arteries (posterior tibial artery or radial artery) was palpable in all patients, and no signs for vessel dysfunction were present.

Conclusion:

The Glidesheath Slender effectively reduces the outer sheath diameter for various types of interventions in small children by one French, reducing the risk of vessel complications (stenosis, occlusion). Interventions via Glidesheath Slender in small patients are safe and feasible and extend the transcatheter possibilities in small children with congenital heart diseases.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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