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Nurse and parent perceptions associated with the Parent Education Discharge Instruction Programme in southern India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 October 2015

Sandra L. Staveski*
Affiliation:
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Research in Patient Services, Heart Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States of America
V. P Parveen
Affiliation:
Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India
Sai B. Madathil
Affiliation:
Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, Ponekkara, Kochi, Kerala, India
Susan Kools
Affiliation:
Family, Community, and Mental Health Systems, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, United States of America
Linda S. Franck
Affiliation:
Family Health Care Nursing, University of California San Francisco School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: S. L. Staveski, RN, PhD, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Research in Patient Services, Heart Institute, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229-3026, United States of America. Tel: 510 599 3994; Fax: 513 636 9765; E-mail: Sandra.staveski@cchmc.org

Abstract

Introduction

Parents of children with CHD require home care knowledge in order to ensure their child’s health and safety, but there has been no research on how to achieve this in a resource-constrained environment. The aim of this investigation was to compare parent and nurse perceptions of parent readiness for discharge after a structured nurse-led parent discharge teaching programme in India.

Materials and methods

A pre-post design was used to compare parent and nurse perceptions of parental uncertainty and readiness for hospital discharge before and after introduction of the parent education discharge instruction programme in a paediatric cardiac surgery unit.

Results

Parents (n=68) and nurses (n=63) participated in this study. After the discharge programme implementation, parents had less uncertainty (M=93.3 SD=10.7 versus M=83.6 SD=4.9, p=0.001) and ambiguity (M=40.8 SD=6.8 versus M=33.4 SD=3.7, p=0.001) about their child’s illness; however, they rated themselves as being less able to cope with the transition to home (M=24.3 SD=4.1 versus 23.1 SD=2.2, p=0.001) and as having less support at home than that required (M=31.5 SD=9.9 versus 30.9 SD=3.2, p=0.001). Parents’ and nurses’ perception of parental readiness for hospital discharge were more closely aligned after implementation of a nurse-led discharge programme (r=0.81, p=0.001).

Conclusion

The results of this study suggest that the discharge programme had positive and negative effects on parental perceptions of uncertainty and readiness for discharge. Further examination is warranted to delineate these influences and to design methods for supporting parents during the transition to home care.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2015 

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