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Midodrine treatment in children with recurrent vasovagal syncope

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2021

Denizhan Bagrul
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Ministry of Health, Ankara City Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Ibrahim Ece
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, University of Health Sciences, Ankara City Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Arzu Yılmaz
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Neurology, Ministry of Health, Ankara Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Fatih Atik
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Ministry of Health, Ankara Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Ahmet Vedat Kavurt
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Ministry of Health, Ankara City Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Vasovagal syncope is the most common cause of syncope in childhood and its treatment is not at a satisfactory level yet. We aimed to investigate patients who were diagnosed with vasovagal syncope, did not benefit from conventional treatment, received midodrine treatment, and to evaluate their response to midodrine treatment.

Methods:

Files of 24 patients who were diagnosed with recurrent vasovagal syncope, did not benefit from non-pharmacological treatments, and received midodrine treatment during June 2017–October 2019 were retrospectively analysed.

Results:

In total, 24 patients received a treatment dose of midodrine at 5 mg/day (2.5 mg BID) included in the study. The mean number of syncope was 5.75 ± 2.67 prior to treatment. Following treatment, the mean number of syncope was 0.42 ± 0.89. It was observed that syncope episodes did not recur in 17 patients, but it recurred in 4 out of 7 patients in the first 3 months of the treatment and did not recur in the following months. The episodes improved in two patients with an increase in the treatment dose, but the syncope episodes continued in only one patient.

Conclusion:

It was concluded that midodrine treatment was effective and safe in adolescents with recurrent vasovagal syncope.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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