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Improved early results with cavopulmonary connections

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2011

Thomas L. Spray
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Divisions of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Cardiotboracic Surgery, The Childern's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylavania, USA
J. William Gaynor
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Divisions of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Cardiotboracic Surgery, The Childern's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylavania, USA
William M. DeCampli
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Divisions of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Cardiotboracic Surgery, The Childern's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylavania, USA
Gil Wernovsky*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine; Divisions of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Cardiology, The Childern's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylavania, USA
*
Correspondence to: Gil Wernovsky, MD, Medical Director, Cardiac Intensive Care Unit, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104–4399, USA. Tel: (215) 590-2200; Fax: (215) 590-4327; Email: Wernovsky@email.chop.edu

Abstract

Background: We describe the recent results in a large cohort of patients with functionally single ventricle who underwent various modifications of cavopulmonary connections. Methods: Using the database at our institution, we identified all children who underwent cavopulmonary connection operations between June 1995 and June 1997. Demographic data, surgical history, and perioperative course were reviewed. Results: We performed 130 consecutive operations in 113 patients. The procedures included superior cavopulmonary connections in the form of the HemiFontan procedure in 45 instances, and bidirectional Glenn procedures in 11, and bilateral superior cavopulmonary connections in 7. The median age of these patients was 7.0 months. We completed Fontan operations using a fenestrated lateral tunnel on 47 occasions, and using an extracardiac conduit 9 times, 5 of which were fenestrated. A lateral tunnel without fenestration was constructed inone patient. The median age for these procedures was 19.5 months. In the remaining 10 instances, we revised Fontan procedures at a median age of 8 years. Diagnoses included hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 43 patients, double outlet right ventricle in 22, heterotaxy in 13, tricuspid atresia in 13, and a miscellaneous group accounting for the other 22. One death (0.7%) occurred within 30 days of surgery. Clinical seizures occurred in 7 children (5.3%), 6 had no residual neurologic deficits. Atrial pacing was needed in 14 children (10.7%) because of transient junctional rhythm, and 2 received treatment for supraventricular tachycardia. Pleural effusions were diagnosed radiographically after 31 of 130 (24%) procedures. Diuretic therapy resolved the effusion in 21 of these, with only 6 children requiring thoracostomy catheter drainage, and 4 undergoing thoracentesis alone. The median length of stay on the intensive care unit was 2 days, with a range from 1 to 30 days, and median stay in hospital was 6 days, with a range from 3 to 58 days. Conclusion: Mortality and perioperative morbidity after cavopulmonary connections have decreased dramatically in the current era. The long-term results of staged reconstruction for functionally single ventricle, nonetheless, await ongoing study.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2001

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