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Flow visualization in anatomically accurate, flow-through models of the main pulmonary artery trunk

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2008

Sheri L. Carroll
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Pediatrics, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Hiroshi Katayama*
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Pediatrics, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
G. William Henry
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Pediatrics, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Jose I. Ferreiro
Affiliation:
From the Departments of Pediatrics, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Rudy Zalesak
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Belinda Ha
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Carol L. Lucas
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, Universizy of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Megha Singh
Affiliation:
The Indian Institute of Technology, Madras
Patricia G. Lynch
Affiliation:
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
Ajit P. Yoganathan
Affiliation:
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
*Corresponding
GB 7220, 311 Burnett-Womack, 229H, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7220, USA. Tel. 919-966-4601; Fax. 919-966-9893.

Abstract

To study the effect of maturational geometric changes on flow characteristics in the pulmonary artery trunk, anatomically accurate, acrylic flow-through models were constructed from four flexible silicone rubber casts obtained in situ in lambs weighing 2.4, 7.8, 9.5, and 11.5 kg. A silicone rubber cast of the right heart was fabricated by injecting the superior caval vein in situ with liquid silicone rubber (Dow Corning's HS-II RTV, Midland, MI). Each cast was used as a template for a transparent acrylic mold of the pulmonary artery trunk and primary generation branches. The acrylic block was then fitted with a curved rigid Plexiglass inflow tube (to simulate the curvature of the right ventricle) just proximal to the pulmonary valve sinuses and mounted in a closed loop system driven by a variable speed pulsatile pump (to simulate physiological flow rates between 0.5 and 4.0 lmin−1) A blood analog solution of polystyrene beads (Rohm & Haas Amberlite, Philadelphia, PA) suspended in a 45% by weight glycerine solution was illuminated by a laser source (15 mwatts, Siemens, Germany) to trace the flow patterns. Two flow field planes of the main pulmonary artery trunk—one parallel, and one perpendicular, to the origins of the right and left arterial branches—were visualized and video recorded (Canon H660 8mm, Japan) for subsequent analysis. A prominent vortex, originating in the center of the main pulmonary artery and directed inferiorly toward the inner wall, was noted in the flow field plane perpendicular to the bifurcation in the 9.5 and 11.5 models. These characteristics were less developed in the 7.8 kg model and not present in the 2.4 kg model, possibly because the angle of curvature was less acute than in the larger models. In the flow field plane parallel to the bifurcation, the patterns were more complex, principally influenced by turbulence in the main pulmonary artery (which increased at higher flow rates) and the geometric changes in the branch pulmonary arteries.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1992

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