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Family history of premature coronary heart disease, child cardio-metabolic risk factors and left ventricular mass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2013

Costan G. Magnussen*
Affiliation:
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland
Terence Dwyer
Affiliation:
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia
Alison Venn
Affiliation:
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia
*
Correspondence to: Dr C. G. Magnussen, Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, MS2 17 Liverpool St, Hobart 7000, Tasmania, Australia. Tel: +61 3 6226 7762; Fax: +61 3 6226 7704; E-mail: cmagnuss@utas.edu.au

Abstract

In a prospective cohort of 181 individuals followed up since childhood – when aged 9, 12 and 15 years – patients with a family history of premature coronary heart disease (n=18) had higher left ventricular mass index in adulthood – at mean age of 31 years – compared with those without (mean±standard error 39.1±1.9 versus 34.6±0.7 g/m2.7, p=0.04). The correlation between adult left ventricular mass index and child triglycerides (r=0.66, p=0.04 versus r=−0.03, p=0.75; pdiff=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (r=0.65, p=0.02 versus r=0.16, p=0.07; pdiff=0.05) was stronger among those with a family history of coronary heart disease than in those without. Although preliminary, these data suggest that the higher left ventricular mass index among adults with a family history might be explained by their increased susceptibility to child cardio-metabolic risk factors.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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