Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-vbn2q Total loading time: 0.258 Render date: 2021-08-01T08:53:39.169Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The effect of left-to-right intracardiac shunting on the distribution of pulmonary arterial axial velocities determined by an intraluminal pulsed Doppler technique

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2008

G. William Henry
Affiliation:
From the Department of PediatricsThe University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
Enrique Criado
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
Carol L. Lucas
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
José I. Ferreiro
Affiliation:
From the Department of PediatricsThe University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
Belinda Ha
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
Sheri L. Carroll
Affiliation:
From the Department of PediatricsThe University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill
Benson R. Wilcox
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill

Abstract

The distribution of axial velocities in the pulmonary artery must be determined to describe accurately the flow in the pulmonary artery. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated the complexity of the velocity profile in the pulmonary trunk and the branch pulmonary arteries with normal and altered pulmonary blood flow. These findings have demonstrated a skewed, parabolic mean velocity profile in the pulmonary trunk under normal hemodynamic conditions. To determine the effect of left-to-right intracardiac shunting on the distribution of axial velocities in the pulmonary artery, an animal model of atrial and ventricular shunting was used. In both models, the distribution of mean axial velocities remained skewed and parabolic with the higher mean velocities recorded toward the anterior wall.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Henry, GW, Lucas, CL. Hemodynamic and geometric influence on pulmonary blood flow in animal models. [press];Google Scholar
2.Lucas, CL, Keagy, BA, Hsiao, HS, Wilcox, BR. Software analysis of 20 MHz pulsed Doppler quadrature data. Ultrasound Med Biol 1983; 9: 641650.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Lucas, CL, Keagy, BA, Hsiao, HS, Johnson, TA, Henry, GW, Wilcox, BR. The velocity profile in the canine ascending aorta and its effects on the accuracy of pulsed Doppler determinations of mean blood velocity. Cardiovasc Res 1984; 18: 282293.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Lucas, CL, Henry, GW, Ferreiro, JI, Ha, B, Keagy, BA, Wilcox, BR. Pulmonary blood velocity profile variability in open-chest dogs: influence of acutely altered hemodynamic states on profiles, and influence of profiles on the accuracy of techniques for cardiac output determinations. Heart Vessels 1988; 4: 6578.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Schultz, DL, Tunstall Pedoe, DS, Lee, GJ, Gunning, AJ, Bellhouse, BJ. Velocity distribution and transition in the arterial system. In: Wolstenholme, GEW, Knight, J (eds). CIBA Foundation Symposium on Circulatory and Respiratory Mass Transport.London, Churchill, 1969, pp 172199.Google Scholar
6.Reubin, SR, Swadling, JP, Lee, GJ. Velocity profiles in the main pulmonary artery of dogs and man, measured with a thin-film resistance anemometer. Circ Res 1970; 27: 9951001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Paulsen, PK. The hot-film anemometer—a method for blood velocity determination. Eur Surg Res 1980; 12: 149158.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Henry, GW, Johnson, TA, Ferreiro, JI, Hsiao, HS, Lucas, CL, Keagy, BA, Lores, ME, Wilcox, BR. Velocity profile in the main pulmonary artery in a canine model. Cardiovasc Res 1984; 10: 620625.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Katayama, H, Henry, GW, Lucas, CL, Ha, B, Ferreiro, JI, Frantz, EG, Krzeski, R. Three-dimensional visualization of pulmonaly blood flow velocity profiles in lambs. Japanese Heart J 1992; 33: 95111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Katayama, H, Henry, GW, Lucas, CL, Ha, B, Ferreiro, JI, Wilcox, BR: Blood flow velocity profiles in pulmonary branch arteries in lambs. [press]Google Scholar
11.Lucas, CL, Henry, GW, Frantz, EG, Ha, B, Ferreiro, JI, Katayama, H, Krzeski, R, Zalesak, R, Wilcox, BR. Ultrasonic assessment of pulmonary hemodynamics in maturing, chronically instrumented lambs with normal and abnormal pulmonary circulations. In: Swamy, NVC, Singh, M (eds). Physiological Fluid Dynamics III. New Delhi, Narosa Publishing House, 1992, pp 3843.Google Scholar
12.Frantz, EG, Heniy, GW, Lucas, CL, Keagy, BA, Lores, ME, Criado, E, Ferreiro, JI, Wilcox, BR. Characteristics of blood flow in the hypertensive canine pulmonary artery. Ultrasound Med Biol 1986; 12: 379385.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Henry, GW, Katayama, H, Lores, ME, Lucas, CL, Ferreiro, JI. Intraluminal pulsed Doppler evaluation of the pulmonary artery flow velocity time curve in a canine model of acute pulmonary hypertension. Chest 1991; 100: 474479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Ha, B, Lucas, CL, Henry, GW, Ferreiro, JI, Keagy, BA, Wilcox, BR. Comparison of two pulsed Doppler techniques for measuring pulmonary velocity profile. Proc 13th Annual Northeast Bioengineering Conf IEEE/EMBS 1987; 2: 361364.Google Scholar
15.Redel, DA, Fehske, W. Diagnosis and follow-up of congenital heart disease in children with the use of two-dimensional echocardiography. Ultrasound Med Biol 1984; 10: 249258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16.Okamoto, M, Miyatake, K, Kinoshita, N, Sakakibara, H, Nimura, Y. Analysis of blood flow in pulmonaiy hypertension with the pulsed Doppler flowmeter combined with cross-sectional echocardiography. Br Heart J 1984; 51: 407415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Yearwood, TL, Chandran, KB. Physiologic pulsatile flow experiments in a model of the human aortic arch. J Biomech 1984; 15: 683704.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Chandran, KB, Yearwood, TL, Eieting, DW. An experimental study of pulsatile flow in a curved tube. J Biomech 1979; 12: 793805.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Lynch, P, Saylor, A, Ha, B, Lucas, C, Henry, GW, Ferreiro, JI, Yoganathan, AP. The effects of curvature on fluid flow fields in pulmonary artery models: flow visualization studies. J Biomech Eng 1993; 115: 97103.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20.Carroll, SL, Katayama, H, Henry, GW, Ferreiro, JI, Zalesak, R, Ha, B, Lucas, CL, Singh, M, Lynch, PG, Yoganathan, AP. Flow visualization in anatomically accurate, flow-through models of the main pulmonary artery trunk. Cardiol Young 1992; 2: 114120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Johnson, TA, Henry, GW, Lucas, CL, Keagy, BA, Lores, ME, Hsiao, HS, Ferreieo, JI, Wilcox, BR. Two-dimensional in vivo pressure/diameter relationships in the canine main pulmonary artery. Cardiovasc Res 1985; 19: 442448.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The effect of left-to-right intracardiac shunting on the distribution of pulmonary arterial axial velocities determined by an intraluminal pulsed Doppler technique
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The effect of left-to-right intracardiac shunting on the distribution of pulmonary arterial axial velocities determined by an intraluminal pulsed Doppler technique
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The effect of left-to-right intracardiac shunting on the distribution of pulmonary arterial axial velocities determined by an intraluminal pulsed Doppler technique
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *