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Discrete subaortic stenosis—rapid evolution in infancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2008

Usha Krishnan
Affiliation:
From the Heart Clinic, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Liverpool
Denise Kitchiner
Affiliation:
From the Heart Clinic, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Liverpool
Narayanswami Sreeram*
Affiliation:
From the Heart Clinic, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Liverpool
*
Correspondence to Dr. Narayanswami Sreeram, Heart Clinic, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Eaton Road, Liverpool, L12 2AP, United Kingdom. Tel. 051 228 4811, Ext. 2710; Fax. 051 228 0328.

Abstract

Discrete subaortic stenosis is an acquired lesion that is rare in infancy. We report an infant in whom the lesion developed within four months after cross-sectional echocardiography had revealed an apparently normal outflow tract. Surgical repair was successfully undertaken.

Type
Brief Report
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1993

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References

1. Freedom, RM, Fowler, RS, Duncan, WJ.Rapid evolution from “normal” left ventricular outflow tract to fatal subaortic stenosis in infancy. Br Heart J 1981; 45: 605609.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. Freedom, RM, Dische, R, Rowe, RD. Pathologic anatomy of subaortic stenosis and atresia in the first year of life. Am J Cardiol 1977; 39: 10351044.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3. Somerville, J.Congenital heart disease—changes in form and function. Br Heart J 1979; 41: 122.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4
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