Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-kbvt8 Total loading time: 0.143 Render date: 2021-10-20T01:54:29.123Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Childhood growth patterns following congenital heart disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 September 2014

David C. Aguilar
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, UC Davis Children Hospital, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, California, United States of America
Gary W. Raff
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, UC Davis Children Hospital, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, California, United States of America
Daniel J. Tancredi
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, UC Davis Children Hospital, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, California, United States of America
Ian J. Griffin*
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, UC Davis Children Hospital, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, California, United States of America
*
Correspondence to: Ian J. Griffin, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, 2516 Stockton Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95917, United States of America. Tel: +916 703 5015; Fax: +916 456 4490; E-mail: ijgriffin@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

Introduction: Prenatal and early postnatal growth are known to be abnormal in patients with CHD. Although adult metabolic risk is associated with growth later in childhood, little is known of childhood growth in CHD. Patients and Methods: Retrospective data were collected on 551 patients with coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, single ventricle physiology, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, or ventricular septal defects. Weight, height, and body mass index data were converted to Z-scores. Body size at 2 years and growth between 2 and 20 years, 2 and 7 years, and 8 and 15 years were compared with Normative data using a sequential series of mixed-effects linear models. Results: A total of 4660 weight, 2989 height, and 2988 body mass index measurements were analysed. Body size at 2 years of age was affected by cardiac diagnosis and gender. Abnormal growth was frequent and varied depending on cardiac diagnosis, gender, and the time period considered. The most abnormal patterns were seen in patients with tetralogy of Fallot, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or single ventricle physiology. Potentially high-risk growth, a combination of small body size at 2 years and rapid subsequent growth, was seen in several groups. Conclusions: Childhood and adolescent growth patterns were gender- and lesion-specific. Several lesions were associated with abnormal patterns of childhood growth known to be associated with an increased risk of adult adiposity or metabolic risk in other populations. Further information is needed on the long-term metabolic risks of survivors of CHD.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Levy, RJ, Rosenthal, A, Fyler, DC, Nadas, AS. Birthweight of infants with congenital heart disease. Am J Dis Child 1978; 132: 249254.Google ScholarPubMed
2 Medoff-Cooper, B, Ravishankar, C. Nutrition and growth in congenital heart disease: a challenge in children. Curr Opin Cardiol 2013; 28: 122129.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3 Cameron, JW, Rosenthal, A, Olson, AD. Malnutrition in hospitalized children with congenital heart disease. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1995; 149: 10981102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Hehir, DA, Cooper, DS, Walters, EM, Ghanayem, NS. Feeding, growth, nutrition, and optimal interstage surveillance for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Cardiol Young 2011; 21 (Suppl 2): 5964.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5 Ohuchi, H, Miyamoto, Y, Yamamoto, M, et al. High prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in young adult patients with complex congenital heart disease. Am Heart J 2009; 158: 3039.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6 Barker, DJ, Eriksson, JG, Forsen, T, Osmond, C. Fetal origins of adult disease: strength of effects and biological basis. Int J Epidemiol 2002; 31: 12351239.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7 Forsen, T, Osmond, C, Eriksson, JG, Barker, DJ. Growth of girls who later develop coronary heart disease. Heart 2004; 90: 2024.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8 Barker, DJ, Osmond, C, Forsen, TJ, Kajantie, E, Eriksson, JG. Trajectories of growth among children who have coronary events as adults. N Engl J Med 2005; 353: 18021809.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9 Kuczmarski, RJ, Ogden, CL, Guo, SS, et al. 2000 CDC growth charts for the United States: methods and development. Vital Health Stat 2002; 11: 1190.Google Scholar
10 Griffin, IJ. Fetal and postnatal growth, and the risks of metabolic syndrome in the AGA and SGA term infant. In Griffin IJ (ed.) Perinatal Growth and Nutrition. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2014: 65118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Jones, A, Charakida, M, Falaschetti, E, et al. Adipose and height growth through childhood and blood pressure status in a large prospective cohort study. Hypertension 2012; 59: 919925.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12 Ekelund, U, Ong, K, Linne, Y, et al. Upward weight percentile crossing in infancy and early childhood independently predicts fat mass in young adults: the Stockholm Weight Development Study (SWEDES). Am J Clin Nutr 2006; 83: 324330.Google Scholar
13 Pinto, NM, Marino, BS, Wernovsky, G, et al. Obesity is a common comorbidity in children with congenital and acquired heart disease. Pediatrics 2007; 120: e1157e1164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Childhood growth patterns following congenital heart disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Childhood growth patterns following congenital heart disease
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Childhood growth patterns following congenital heart disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *