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Adaptation of the child and family to life with a chronic illness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2006

Kathleen Mussatto
Affiliation:
Herma Heart Center, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America

Abstract

Chronic illness in a child produces stress for both the child with the illness and the family of which he or she is a part.1 Today, it is estimated that greater than one-tenth of children are living with some form of chronic illness or condition.23 Faced with this stress, children and families are required to adapt to potential physical, emotional, social, and financial challenges. Professionals providing health care have an opportunity to influence how children and families interpret and adapt to these challenges. Guidance can be drawn from the multiple theoretical perspectives that have explored the process of adaptation to chronic illness.

Type
Long-term Outcomes
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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