Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-4nk8m Total loading time: 0.223 Render date: 2021-10-16T23:45:40.451Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The Validation of Longitudinal Studies: The Case of the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA).

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2010

W.F. Forbes
Affiliation:
University of Waterloo
B.D. McPherson
Affiliation:
University of Waterloo
M.A. Shadbolt-Forbes
Affiliation:
University of Waterloo

Abstract

Longitudinal studies are examined with special reference to the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA). The specific aspects discussed are the representativeness of the sample, attrition rates, end-points, and associations, particularly the associations with age. It is concluded that, in comparison with other longitudinal studies, both in Canada and the U.S., the LSA represents a good source of longitudinal data and therefore lends itself to analyses which may be used to investigate factors expected to be important in understanding various aspects of the aging process.

Résumé

Les études longitudinales sont examinées, plus particulièrement en rapport à l'Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA). Pluşieurs aspects sont discutés, dont la représentativité de l'échantillon, les taux d'attrition, les résultats, et les associations, en particulier les associations à l'âge. En conclusion, comparé à d'autres études longitudinales effectuées au Canada et aux Etats-Unis, le LSA s'avère une importante source de donnéees longitudinales et se prête donc bien aux analyses qui peuvent servir dans l'étude des facteurs soi-disant importants favorisant une compréhension accrue de tous les aspects du vieillissement.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 1989

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Busse, E.W. (1970). A Physiological, Psychological, and Sociological Study of Aging, pp. 3–6. In Palmore, E., (Ed.), Normal Aging. Reports from the Duke Longitudinal Study, 19551969. Durham N.C.: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
Chirikos, T.N. & Nestel, G. (1985). Longitudinal analysis of functional disabilities in older men. Journal of Gerontology, 40 (4), 426433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Costa, P.T. Jr, & McCrae, R.R. (1980). Somatic Complaints in Males as a Function of Age and Neuroticism: A Longitudinal Analysis. Journal of Behavioral Mediane, 3, 245257.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dawber, T.R., Kannel, W.B. & Lyell, L.P. (1963). An approach to longitudinal studies in a community: The Framingham Study. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 107, 539556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goudy, W.J. (1985). Sample attrition and multivariate analysis in the retirement history study. Journal of Gerontology, 40(3), 358367.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Government of Canada (1981). The Health of Canadians: Report of the Canada Health Survey. Cat. No. 82- 538E. Ottawa, Ontario: Health and Welfare Canada and Statistics Canada.Google Scholar
Government of Canada (1986). Report of the Canadian Health and Disability Survey 1983–1984. Cat. No. 82–555E. Ottawa, Ontario: Statistics Canada and the Department of The Secretary of State of Canada.Google Scholar
Granick, S. and Patterson, R.D. (1971) (Eds.). Human Aging II. U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Publication No. (HSM) 719037Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
Haberman, P. (1969). The reliability and validity of the data. pp. 343383 in Poverty and Health, by Antonovsky, Kosa, and Zola, (Eds.). Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Havens, B. (1987). Private Communication.Google Scholar
Hirdes, J., Brown, K.S., Forbes, W.F., Vigoda, D.S. & Crawford, L. (1986). The Association Between Self-Reported Income and Perceived Health Based on the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging. Canadian Journal on Aging, 5, 189204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirdes, J., Brown, K.S., Vigoda, D.S., Forbes, W.F. & Crawford, L. (1987). Health Effects of Cigarette Smoking: Data from the Ontario Longitudinal Study on Aging. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 78, 1317.Google ScholarPubMed
Jylha, M., Eskinen, E., Alanen, E., Leskinen, A.-L. & Heikkinen, E.Self-Rated Health and Associated Factors Among Men of Different Ages. Journal of Gerontology, 41, 710717.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
LaRue, A., Bank, L., Jarvik, L. & Hetland, M. (1979). Health in Old Age: How Do Physicians' Ratings and Self-ratings Compare? Journal of Gerontology, 34, 687691.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liang, J. (1986). Self-Reported Physical Health Among Aged Adults. Journal of Gerontology, 41, 248260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Linn, B.S. & Linn, M.W. (1980). Objective and self-assessed health in the old and very old. Soc. Sci & Med., 14A, 311315.Google Scholar
Maclntyre, N.R., Mitchell, R.E., Oberman, A., Harlan, W., Graybiel, A. & Johnson, E. (1978). Longevity in military pilots: 37 year follow-up of the Navy's “1000 Aviators”. Aviat. Space Environ. Med., 49, 11201122.Google Scholar
Maddox, G.L. (1962). Selected Methodological Issues. Proc. Social Statistics Section American Statistkal Association, 280285.Google Scholar
Maddox, G.L. & Douglas, E.B. (1973). Self-Assessment of Health: A Longitudinal Study of Elderly Subjects. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 14, 8793.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Markides, K.S. (1986). Letters to the Editor. Journal of Gerontology, 41 (6), 806.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Minister for Senior Citizens Affairs (1985). Elderly Residents in Ontario: their Health Status and Use of the Health Care System.Google Scholar
Mossey, J.M., Havens, B., Roos, N.P. & Shapiro, E. (1981). The Manitoba longitudinal study on aging: Description and methods. The Gerontologist, 21, (5), 551558.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Norris, F.H., Goudy, W.J. (1986). Letters to the Editor. Journal of Gerontology, 41 (6), 806807.Google Scholar
Palmore, E. (1974). Appendix A. Design of the Adaptation Study, pp. 291–296. In Palmore, E. (Ed.) Normal Aging II. Reports from the Duke Longitudinal Studies, 1970–1973. Durham N.C.: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
Pames, H.S. (1981). Ch. 1. Introduction and Overview. In Pames, H.S. (Ed.), Work and Retirement: A Longitudinal Study of Men. Cambridge, Massachusetts: M.I.T. Press.Google Scholar
Ries, P.W. (1983). Americans Assess their Health: United States, 1978. Data from the National Health Survey, Series 10, Number 142. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. DDHS Publication No. (PHS) 831570.Google Scholar
Shock, N.W. (1984a). Chapter 1. Methods for me Study of Aging. In Shock, N.W., et al. (Eds.), The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington D.C. 20402, D.I.H. Publication No. 842450.Google Scholar
Shock, N.W. (1984b). Chapter 3. Design and operation of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. In Shock, N.W., et al. (Eds.), The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington D.C. 20402, D.I.H. Publication No. 842450.Google Scholar
Tessler, R. & Mechanic, D. (1978). Psychological distress and self perceived health. J. of Health and Social Behavior, 19, 254262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tissue, T. (1972). Another Look at Self-Rated Health Among the Elderly. Journal of Gerontology, 27, 9194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1983a. Americans Assess their Health: United States, 1978. Data from the National Healm Survey, Series 10, Number 142.Google Scholar
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1983b. Physician Visits: Volume and Interval Since Last Visit, United States 1980. Data from the National Health Survey, Series 10, Number 144.Google Scholar
13
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Validation of Longitudinal Studies: The Case of the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA).
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The Validation of Longitudinal Studies: The Case of the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA).
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The Validation of Longitudinal Studies: The Case of the Ontario Longitudinal Study of Aging (LSA).
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *