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Risk Factors for Serious Falls Among Community-Based Seniors: Results from the National Population Health Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2010

Paula C. Fletcher
Affiliation:
Wilfrid Laurier University
John P. Hirdes
Affiliation:
University of Waterloo and Homewood Research Institute

Abstract

This paper examines factors associated with falling among approximately 3,100 individuals aged 65 and older who were participants in the 1994 National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The intent of the NPHS is to monitor the health of Canadians and risk factors that affect their health. Several factors were identified as increasing the risk of falling, such as advanced age, being female, certain medical conditions, medication use and impaired mobility. The results from this survey, conducted on a national level, confirm the findings of many studies utilizing smaller samples within individual communities. Continuation of the NPHS will aid in offering longitudinal data with respect to falls, and allow for establishing a temporal order prior to the fall event, in order to provide more definitive evidence with respect to risk factors for falls.

Résumé

Ce document examine les facteurs associés aux chutes dans un groupe d'environ 3,100 personnes âgées de 65 ans et plus ayant participé à l'Enquête nationale sur la santé de la population de 1994. L'Enquête visait à étudier la santé des Canadiens et les facteurs de risque qui la menacent. Elle a permis de relever divers facteurs influant sur le risque de chute, notamment l'avancement en âge, le fait d'être une femme, certains états de santé, l'utilisation de certains médicaments et la difficulté de se déplacer. Les résultats de cette étude menée à l'échelle nationale confirment les conclusions de plusieurs études de moindre ampleur effectuées au sein de collectivités. La poursuite de l'Enquête permettra d'établir des données longitudinales en ce qui a trait aux chutes ainsi qu'une séquence temporelle précédant les chutes, ce qui fournira des données plus solides sur les facteurs de risque de chutes.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 2002

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