Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-7xdgm Total loading time: 0.292 Render date: 2021-07-25T12:42:37.127Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Exploring the Relationships Between Families and Staff Caring for Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities: Family Members' Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2010

James Gladstone
Affiliation:
McMaster University
Evelyn Wexler
Affiliation:
Doctoral Candidate, University of Toronto

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to learn more about the relationships that families develop with staff who work in the facilities in which their relatives live. Data were collected through participant observation in two long-term care facilities and through personal interviews with 61 family members. Five types of relationships emerged from the data, including relationships that were “collegial,” “professional,” “friendship,” “distant,” and “tense”. Several factors appeared to be associated with positive relationships developed between families and staff, including contact with purpose, shared experiences, and issues of trust. Families also reported a number of benefits from developing positive relationships with staff.

Résumé

Cette étude qualitative vise à cerner d'avantage les liens développés par les familles avec le personnel qui travaille dans les établissements où vivent leurs parents. Ces données reposent sur les observations de bénéficiaires de deux établissements de soin de longue durée et sur des entrevues auprès de 61 membres de leur famille. Elles font ressortir cinq types de relations, soit des relations «égalitaires», «professionnelles», «amicales», «distantes» et «tendues». Divers facteurs semblent associés aux relations positives développées entre les familles et le personnel, notamment les liens reliés au but visé, les expériences partagées et les questions de confiance. Les familles ont aussi soulevé un certain nombre de bénéfices reliés au développement de relations positives avec le personnel.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Aneshensel, C.S., Pearlin, L.I., Mullan, J.T., Zarit, S.H., & Whitlatch, C.J., (1995). Profiles in caregiving. The unexpected career. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Bitzan, J.F., & Kruzich, J.M. (1990). Interpersonal relationships of nursing home residents. The Gerontologist, 30(3), 385390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowers, B. (1988). Family perceptions of care in a nursing home. The Gerontologist, 28(3), 361368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brody, E.M., Dempsey, N.P., & Pruchno, R.A. (1990). Mental health of sons and daughters of the institutionalized aged. The Gerontologist, 30(2), 212219.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chenoweth, B., & Spencer, B. (1986). Dementia: The experience of family caregivers. The Gerontologist, 26(3), 267272.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Denton, M. (1997). The linkages between informal and formal care of the elderly. Canadian Journal on Aging, 16(1), 3050.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Duncan, M.T., & Morgan, D. (1994). Sharing the caring: Family caregivers' views of their relationships with nursing home staff. The Gerontologist, 34 2, 235244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dupuis, S.L., & Norris, J.E. (1997). A multidimensional and contextual framework for understanding diverse family members' roles in long-term care facilities. Journal Of Aging Studies, 11(4), 297325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edelson, J.S., & Lyons, W.H. (1985). Institutional care of the mentally impaired elderly. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
Gladstone, J.W. (1995a). The marital perceptions of elderly persons living or having a spouse living in a long-term institution in Canada. The Gerontologist, 35(1), 5260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gladstone, J.W. (1995b). Elderly married persons living in long-term care institutions: A qualitative analysis of feelings. Ageing and Society, 15, 493513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gladstone, J.W., & Wexler, E. (2000). A family perspective of family/staff interaction in long-term care facilities. Geriatric Nursing, 21, 1619.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glaser, B.G., & Strauss, A.L., (1967). The discovery of grounded theory: Strategies for qualitative research. New York: Aldine Pub. Co.Google Scholar
Horowitz, A., (1985). Family caregiving to the frail elderly. In Lawton, P. & Maddox, G. (Eds.), Annual review of gerontology and geriatrics vol. 5 (pp. 194246). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
Keating, N.C., Fast, J.E., Connidis, I.A., Penning, M., & Keefe, J., (1997). Bridging policy and research in eldercare. Canadian Journal on Aging, (Suppl.), 2241.Google Scholar
Lofland, J., & Lofland, L.H., (1984). Analyzing social settings. A guide to qualitative observation and analysis. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
Maas, M.L., Swanson, E.A., Specht, J., & Reed, D. (1997). Family-staff partnerships in long-term care. Paper presented at the Gerontological Society of America 50th Annual Scientific Meeting, Cincinnati, OH.Google Scholar
Marshall, V.W. (1980). No exit: An interpretive perspective on aging. In Marshall, V.W. (Ed.), Aging in Canada (pp. 5160) Toronto ON: Fitzhenry & Whiteside.Google Scholar
Montgomery, R.J.V. (1983). Staff—family relations and institutional care policies. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 6, 2537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Patton, M.Q., (1980). Qualitative evaluation methods. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Pearlin, L.I., (1992). The careers of caregivers. The Gerontologist, 32 5, 647.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pillemer, K., Hegeman, C.R., Albright, B., & Henderson, C. (1998). Building bridges between families and nursing staff: The partners in caregiving program. The Gerontologist, 38(4), 499503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pratt, C.C., Schmall, V.L., Wright, S., & Cleland, M. (1985). Burden and coping strategies of caregivers to Alzheimer's patients. Family Relations, 34, 2733.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ross, M.M., Rosenthal, C.J., & Dawson, P.G. (1997). Spousal caregiving in the institutional setting: Task performance. Canadian Journal on Aging, 16(1), 5169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, M.G., (1987). The patient's partner: The spouse in residential care. Health and Social Work, (summer), 206212.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schwartz, A.N., & Vogel, M.E. (1990). Nursing home staff and residents' families role expectations. The Gerontologist, 30(1), 4953.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shuttlesworth, G.E., Rubin, A., & Duffy, M. (1982). Families versus institutions: Incongruent role expectations in the nursing home. The Gerontologist, 22(2), 200208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, K.F., & Bengtson, V.L. (1979). Positive consequences of institutionalization: Solidarity between elderly parents and their middle-aged children. The Gerontologist, 19(5), 438447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Solomon, R. (1982). Serving families of the institutionalized aged: The four crises. Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 5, 8396.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stephens, M.A.P., Kinney, J.M., & Ogrocki, P.K. (1991). Stressors and well-being among caregivers to older adults with dementia: The in-home versus nursing home experience. The Gerontologist, 31(2), 217223.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Troll, L.E. (1983). Grandparents: The family watchdogs. In Brubaker, T. (Ed.), Family relationships in later life (pp. 6374). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
Zarit, S.H., & Whitlatch, C.J. (1992). Institutional placement: Phases of the transition. The Gerontologist, 32(5), 665672.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Exploring the Relationships Between Families and Staff Caring for Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities: Family Members' Perspectives
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Exploring the Relationships Between Families and Staff Caring for Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities: Family Members' Perspectives
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Exploring the Relationships Between Families and Staff Caring for Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities: Family Members' Perspectives
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *