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Coping and Control Processes: Do They Contribute to Individual Differences in Health in Older Adults?*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 November 2010

Tannis Y. Arbuckle
Affiliation:
Concordia University
Dolores Pushkar
Affiliation:
Concordia University
June Chaikelson
Affiliation:
Concordia University
David Andres
Affiliation:
Concordia University

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on the relation of coping and control processes to health outcomes in late adulthood and presents new data on relations between coping and control processes and health for 295 World War II veterans. The results for the veterans showed that health was positively associated with cognitive coping, and negatively associated with behavioural coping and avoidance. No association was found between perceived locus of control and health. These findings, together with those in the literature, were discussed in terms of their implications for future research on the role of coping and control in health maintenance and their significance for people working with older persons.

Résumé

Cet article recense les écrits scientifiques sur la relation entre d'une part, les processus de contrôle et d'adaptation et d'autre part, l'état de santé à l'âge adulte avancé. Il se poursuit par une nouvelle analyse des relations entre ces variables auprès d'un échantillon de 295 hommes âgés, tous vétérans de la 2e Guerre Mondiale. Les résultats pour ces vétérans ont révélé que l'état de santé était associé positivement aux stratégies cognitives d'adaptation et relié négativement aux stratégies comportementales d'adaptation et d'évitement. Aucune association n'a été obtenue entre le locus de contrôle perçu et l'état de santé. L'implication des résultats pour les études futures portant sur le rôle des processus de contrôle et d'adaptation dans le maintien de l'état de santé ainsi que les retombées pour les intervenants oeuvrant auprès des personnes âgées sont discutées.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association on Gerontology 1999

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