Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-2qt69 Total loading time: 0.288 Render date: 2022-08-08T15:13:53.533Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Reid on the first principles of morals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2020

Terence Cuneo*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, University of Vermont, 70 S. Williams, Burlington, VT, 05401
*

Abstract

What role do the first principles of morals play in Reid's moral theory? Reid has an official line regarding their role, which identifies these principles as foundational propositions that evidentially ground other moral propositions. I claim that, by Reid's own lights, this line of thought is mistaken. There is, however, another line of thought in Reid, one which identifies the first principles of morals as constitutive of moral thought. I explore this interpretation, arguing that it is a fruitful way of understanding much of what Reid wants to say about the role of moral first principles and drawing some connections between it and recent work on moral nonnaturalism.

Type
Moral Theory
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Castagnetto, Susan V. 1992. “Reid's Answer to Abstract Ideas.” Journal of Philosophical Research XVII: 3960.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cuneo, Terence 2011. “Thomas Reid's Ethics.” In The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, edited by Zalta, Edward http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/reid-ethics/ (1/11).Google Scholar
Cuneo, Terence and Shafer-Landau, Russ 2014. “The Moral Fixed Points: New Directions for Moral Nonnaturalism.” Philosophical Studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11098-013-0277-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hare, R. M. 1952. The Language of Morals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Korsgaard, Christine 2008. Self-constitution. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Leftow, Brian 2012. God and Necessity. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McNaughton, David 1996. “An Unconnected Heap of Duties?Philosophical Quarterly 46: 443447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parfit, Derek 2011. On What Matters, Vol. II. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Reid, Thomas 1990. Practical Ethics. Edited by Haakonssen, Knud Princeton: Princeton University Press. (Abbreviated as PE).Google Scholar
Reid, Thomas 2002. Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man. Edited by Brookes, Derek R. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. (Abbreviated as EIP).Google Scholar
Reid, Thomas 2010. Essays on the Active Powers of Man. Edited by James Harris and Knud Haakonssen. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. (Abbreviated as EAP).Google Scholar
Rysiew, Patrick 2002. “Reid and Epistemic Naturalism.The Philosophical Quarterly 52: 437456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rysiew, Patrick forthcoming. “Thomas Reid on Language.” In Linguistic Meaning: New Essays on the History of the Philosophy of Language, edited by Margaret Cameron, and Robert Stainton. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Tuggy, Dale 2000. “Thomas Reid on Causation.Reid Studies 3: 327.Google Scholar
Van Cleve, James 1999. “Reid on the First Principles of Contingent Truths.” Reid Studies 3: 330.Google Scholar
Wolterstorff, Nicholas 2001. Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Wolterstorff, Nicholas 2004. “Reid on Common sense.” In The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid, edited by Terence Cuneo, and René van Woudenberg, 77–100. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reid on the first principles of morals
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Reid on the first principles of morals
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Reid on the first principles of morals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *