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P101: Sex-specific Troponin T cutoffs for ruling out acute myocardial infarction at ED arrival

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2018

A. D. McRae*
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
M. Graham
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
T. Abedin
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
J. Ji
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
H. Yang
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
D. Wang
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
D. Southern
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
J. E. Andruchow
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
E. S. Lang
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
G. Innes
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
I. Seiden-Long
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
L. DeKoning
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
P. Kavsak
Affiliation:
University of Calgary, Calgary, AB
*
*Corresponding author

Abstract

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Introduction: ex-specific diagnostic cutoffs may improve the test characteristics of high-sensitivity troponin assays for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Sex-specific cutoffs for ruling in MI improve the sensitivity of the assay for MI among women, and improve the specificity of diagnosis among men. We hypothesized that the use of sex-specific high-sensitivity Troponin T (hsTnT) cutoffs for ruling out MI at the time of ED arrival would improve the classification efficiency of the assay by enabling more patients to have MI ruled out at the time of ED arrival while maintaining diagnostic sensitivity. The objective of this study was to quantify the test characteristics of sex-specific cutoffs of an hsTnT assay for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) when performed at ED arrival in patients with chest pain. Methods: This retrospective study included consecutive ED patients with suspected cardiac chest pain evaluated in four urban EDs were, excluding those with ST-elevation AMI, cardiac arrest or abnormal kidney function. The primary outcomes was AMI at 7 days. Secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiac events (MACE: all-cause mortality, AMI and revascularization) and the individual MACE components. We quantified test characteristics (sensitivity, negative predictive value, likelihood ratios and proportion of patients ruled out) for multiple combinations of sex-specific rule-out cutoffs. We calculated net reclassification improvement compared to universal rule-out cutoffs of 5ng/L (the assays limit of detection) and 6ng/L (the FDA-approved limit of quantitation for US laboratories). Results: 7130 patients, including 3931 men and 3199 women, were included. The 7-day incidence of AMI was 7.38% among men and 3.78% among women. Universal cutoffs of 5 and 6 ng/L ruled out AMI with 99.7% sensitivity in 33.6 and 42.2% of patients. The best-performing combination of sex-specific cutoffs (8g/L for men and 6ng/L for men) ruled out AMI with 98.7% sensitivity in 51.9% of patients. Conclusion: Sex-specific hsTnT cutoffs for ruling out AMI at ED arrival may achieve substantial improvement in classification performance, enabling more patients to be ruled out at ED arrival, while maintaining acceptable diagnostic sensitivity for AMI. Universal and sex-specific rule-out cutoffs differ by only small changes in hsTnT concentration. Therefore, these findings should be confirmed in other datasets.

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2018