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LO37: Barriers and enablers to direct observation of clinical performance a qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2018

W. J. Cheung
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa, ON
A. M. Patey
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa, ON
J. R. Frank
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa, ON
M. Mackay
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa, ON
S. Boet
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa, ON

Abstract

Introduction: Direct observation is essential to assess medical trainees and provide them with feedback to support their progression from novice to competent physicians. However, learners consistently report infrequent observations, and calls to increase direct observation in medical training abound. In this study, a theory-driven approach using the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was applied to systematically investigate factors that serve as barriers and enablers to direct observation in residency training. Methods: Semi-structured interviews of faculty and residents from various specialties at two large tertiary-care teaching hospitals were conducted. An interview guide based on the TDF was used to capture 14 theoretical domains that may influence direct observation. Interview transcripts were independently coded using direct content analysis by two researchers, and specific beliefs were generated by grouping similar responses. Relevant domains were identified based on the frequencies of beliefs reported, presence of conflicting beliefs, and perceived influence on direct observation practices. Results: Data saturation was achieved after 12 resident and 13 faculty interviews, with a total of 10 different specialties represented. Median postgraduate year among residents was 4 (range 1-6), and mean years of independent practice among faculty was 10.3 (SD=8.6). Ten TDF domains were identified as influencing direct observation: knowledge, skills, beliefs about consequences, social professional role and identity, intention, goals, memory/attention/decision-making, environmental context and resources, social influences, and behavioural regulation. Discord between faculty and resident intentions to engage in direct observation, coupled with the social expectation that residents should be responsible for ensuring observations occur, was identified as a key barrier. Additionally, competing demands identified across multiple TDF domains emerged as an important and pervasive theme. Conclusion: This study identified key barriers and enablers to direct observation. The influencing factors identified in this study provide a basis for the development of potential strategies aimed at embedding direct observation as a routine pedagogical practice in residency training.

Type
Oral Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2018 
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