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LO36: Hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan) for abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 May 2019

N. Poonai
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
S. Elsie
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
K. Kumar
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
K. Coriolano
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
S. Brahmbhatt
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
E. Dzongkowski
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
H. Stevens
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
P. Gupta
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
M. Miller
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
D. Ashok
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
G. Joubert
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
A. Butter
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON
S. Ali
Affiliation:
Western University, London, ON

Abstract

Introduction: Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons for an emergency department (ED) visit. Most cases are functional and no therapy has proven effective. Our objective was to determine if hyoscine butylbromide (HBB) (BuscopanTM) is effective for children who present to the ED with functional abdominal pain. Methods: We conducted a randomized, blinded, superiority trial comparing HBB 10 mg plus acetaminophen placebo to oral acetaminophen 15 mg/kg (max 975 mg) plus HBB placebo using a double-dummy approach. We included children 8-17 years presenting to the ED at London Health Sciences Centre with colicky abdominal pain rated >40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). The primary outcome was VAS pain score at 80 minutes post-administration. Secondary outcomes included adverse effects; caregiver satisfaction with pain management using a five-item Likert scale; recidivism and missed surgical diagnoses within 24-hours of discharge. Analysis was based on intention to treat. Results: We analyzed 225 participants (112 acetaminophen; 113 HBB). The mean (SD) age was 12.4 (3.0) years and 148/225 (65.8%) were females. Prior to enrollment, the median (IQR) duration of pain prior was 2 (4.5) hours and analgesia was provided to 101/225 (44.9%) of participants. The mean (SD) pre-intervention pain scores in the acetaminophen and HBB groups were 62.7 (15.9) mm and 60.3 (17.3) mm, respectively. At 80 minutes, the mean (SD) pain scores in the acetaminophen and HBB groups were 30.1 (28.8) mm and 29.4 (26.4) mm, respectively and there were no significant differences adjusting for pre-intervention scores (p = 0.96). The median (IQR) caregiver satisfaction was high in the acetaminophen [5 (2)] and HBB [5 (1)] groups (p = 0.79). The median (IQR) length of stay between acetaminophen [235 (101)] and HBB [234 (103)] was not significantly different (p = 0.53). The proportion of participants with a return visit for abdominal pain was 4/112 (3.5%) in the acetaminophen group and 6/113 (5.3%) in the HBB group. The most common adverse effect was nausea (9% in each group) and there were no significant differences in adverse effects between acetaminophen (26/112, 23.2%) and HBB (31/113, 27.4%) (p = 0.52). There were no missed surgical diagnoses. Conclusion: For children with presumed functional abdominal pain who present to the ED, both acetaminophen and HBB produce a clinically important (VAS < 30 mm) reduction in pain and should be routinely considered in this clinical setting.

Type
Oral Presentations
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2019 
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LO36: Hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan) for abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial
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