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Implementation of small-group reflection rounds at an emergency medicine residency program

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2015

Leana S. Wen*
Affiliation:
Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, Division of Emergency Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospitals/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Justin T. Baca
Affiliation:
Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, Division of Emergency Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospitals/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Patricia O'Malley
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Kriti Bhatia
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA
David Peak
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
J. Kimo Takayesu
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
*
Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency, Brigham & Women's Hospitals/Massachusetts General Hospital, 178 Marlborough Street, #5, Boston, MA 02116; Wen.Leana@gmail.com

Abstract

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Few residency curricular interventions have focused on improving well-being and promoting humanism. We describe the implementation of a novel curriculum based on small-group reflection rounds—the Emergency Medicine Reflection Rounds (EMRR)—at a 4-year US emergency medicine (EM) residency. During the inaugural year (2010–2011), nine residents volunteered to take part in 1-hour monthly sessions with faculty facilitators. Residents were provided with a confidential environment to discuss difficult ethical and interpersonal encounters from their clinical experiences. Ongoing feedback from participants was solicited, culminating with a four-question survey in which all respondents remarked that the EMRR contributed to improving their own well-being and agreed that it provided an important forum for residents to discuss difficult issues in a safe environment. In this article, we describe our innovation as an example of a wellness initiative that has promoted reflective practice and fostered cooperative learning around the communication, professional, and ethical challenges inherent in EM practice. Our EMRR model may be useful to other EM residences looking to supplement their wellness curriculum.

Type
Brief Educational Report • Bref compte
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians 2013

References

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