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Two new feather mites (Acari: Astigmata) from the Turkey Vulture (Ciconiiformes: Cathartidae) in Canada

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2012

Sergei V. Mironov
Affiliation:
Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Universitetskaya emb. 1, Saint Petersburg, Russia 199034
Terry D. Galloway*
Affiliation:
Department of Entomology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2
*
1 Corresponding author (e-mail: Terry_Galloway@umanitoba.ca).

Abstract

Two new feather mites are described from the Turkey Vulture, Cathartes aura (Linnaeus), in Canada: Ancyralges cathartinussp. nov. (Analgoidea: Analgidae) and Cathartacarus auraegen. nov., sp. nov. (Pterolichoidea: Gabuciniidae). Both species of feather mites have their closest relatives among ectoparasites of the Falconiformes. No species of feather mites related to those which have been found on Ciconiiformes are known to parasitize Cathartidae.

Résumé

On trouvera ici la description de deux espèces nouvelles d'acariens découvertes dans le plumage d'urubus à tête rouge, Cathartes aura (Linné) au Canada : Ancyralges cathartinussp. nov. (Analgoidea : Analgidae) et Cathartacarus auraegen. nov., sp. nov. (Pterolichoidea : Gabuciniidae). Les deux espèces ont leurs plus proches parents chez les acariens plumicoles ectoparasites des Falconiformes. Aucun acarien plumicole apparenté aux espèces trouvées sur les Ciconiiformes ne semble parasiter les Cathartidae.

[Traduit par la Rédaction]

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Entomological Society of Canada 2003

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